To round in
Round Round, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Rounded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Rounding}.] 1. To make circular, spherical, or cylindrical; to give a round or convex figure to; as, to round a silver coin; to round the edges of anything. [1913 Webster]

Worms with many feet, which round themselves into balls, are bred chiefly under logs of timber. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

The figures on our modern medals are raised and rounded to a very great perfection. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

2. To surround; to encircle; to encompass. [1913 Webster]

The inclusive verge Of golden metal that must round my brow. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. To bring to fullness or completeness; to complete; hence, to bring to a fit conclusion. [1913 Webster]

We are such stuff As dreams are made on, and our little life Is rounded with a sleep. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

4. To go round wholly or in part; to go about (a corner or point); as, to round a corner; to round Cape Horn. [1913 Webster]

5. To make full, smooth, and flowing; as, to round periods in writing. --Swift. [1913 Webster]

{To round in} (Naut.) To haul up; usually, to haul the slack of (a rope) through its leading block, or to haul up (a tackle which hangs loose) by its fall. --Totten. (b) To collect together (cattle) by riding around them, as on cattle ranches. [Western U.S.] [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To turn in — Turn Turn (t[^u]rn), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Turned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Turning}.] [OE. turnen, tournen, OF. tourner, torner, turner, F. tourner, LL. tornare, fr. L. tornare to turn in a lathe, to rounds off, fr. tornus a lathe, Gr. ? a turner s… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To turn in — Turn Turn, v. i. 1. To move round; to have a circular motion; to revolve entirely, repeatedly, or partially; to change position, so as to face differently; to whirl or wheel round; as, a wheel turns on its axis; a spindle turns on a pivot; a man… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To come in — Come Come, v. i. [imp. {Came}; p. p. {Come}; p. pr & vb. n. {Coming}.] [OE. cumen, comen, AS. cuman; akin to OS.kuman, D. komen, OHG. queman, G. kommen, Icel. koma, Sw. komma, Dan. komme, Goth. giman, L. venire (gvenire), Gr. ? to go, Skr. gam.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To whip in — Whip Whip, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Whipped}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Whipping}.] [OE. whippen to overlay, as a cord, with other cords, probably akin to G. & D. wippen to shake, to move up and down, Sw. vippa, Dan. vippe to swing to and fro, to shake, to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To run in — Run Run, v. i. [imp. {Ran}or {Run}; p. p. {Run}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Running}.] [OE. rinnen, rennen (imp. ran, p. p. runnen, ronnen). AS. rinnan to flow (imp. ran, p. p. gerunnen), and iernan, irnan, to run (imp. orn, arn, earn, p. p. urnen); akin… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To bring in — Bring Bring, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Brought}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Bringing}.] [OE. bringen, AS. bringan; akin to OS. brengian, D. brengen, Fries. brenga, OHG. bringan, G. bringen, Goth. briggan.] 1. To convey to the place where the speaker is or is to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To brace in — Brace Brace, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Braced}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Bracing}.] 1. To furnish with braces; to support; to prop; as, to brace a beam in a building. [1913 Webster] 2. To draw tight; to tighten; to put in a state of tension; to strain; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To circle in — Circle Cir cle, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Circled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Circling}.] [OE. cerclen, F. cercler, fr. L. circulare to make round. See {Circle}, n., and cf. {Circulate}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To move around; to revolve around. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hem in — Hem Hem, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Hemmed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Hemming}.] 1. To form a hem or border to; to fold and sew down the edge of. Wordsworth. [1913 Webster] 2. To border; to edge [1913 Webster] All the skirt about Was hemmed with golden fringe …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To turn in the mind — Turn Turn (t[^u]rn), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Turned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Turning}.] [OE. turnen, tournen, OF. tourner, torner, turner, F. tourner, LL. tornare, fr. L. tornare to turn in a lathe, to rounds off, fr. tornus a lathe, Gr. ? a turner s… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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