To rig a ship
Rig Rig, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Rigged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Rigging}.] [Norweg. rigga to bind, particularly, to wrap round, rig; cf. AS. wr[=i]han to cover.] 1. To furnish with apparatus or gear; to fit with tackling. [1913 Webster]

2. To dress; to equip; to clothe, especially in an odd or fanciful manner; -- commonly followed by out. [1913 Webster]

Jack was rigged out in his gold and silver lace. --L'Estrange. [1913 Webster]

{To rig a purchase}, to adapt apparatus so as to get a purchase for moving a weight, as with a lever, tackle, capstan, etc.

{To rig a ship} (Naut.), to fit the shrouds, stays, braces, etc., to their respective masts and yards. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To dress a ship — Dress Dress (dr[e^]s), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dressed} (dr[e^]st) or {Drest}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Dressing}.] [OF. drecier to make straight, raise, set up, prepare, arrange, F. dresser, (assumed) LL. directiare, fr. L. dirigere, directum, to direct;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To rig a purchase — Rig Rig, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Rigged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Rigging}.] [Norweg. rigga to bind, particularly, to wrap round, rig; cf. AS. wr[=i]han to cover.] 1. To furnish with apparatus or gear; to fit with tackling. [1913 Webster] 2. To dress; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rig — Rig, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Rigged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Rigging}.] [Norweg. rigga to bind, particularly, to wrap round, rig; cf. AS. wr[=i]han to cover.] 1. To furnish with apparatus or gear; to fit with tackling. [1913 Webster] 2. To dress; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Ship — A ship IPA|/ʃɪp/ audio|en us ship.ogg|Audio (US) is a large vessel that floats on water. Ships are generally distinguished from boats based on size. Ships may be found on lakes, seas, and rivers and they allow for a variety of activities, such as …   Wikipedia

  • To dress out — Dress Dress (dr[e^]s), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dressed} (dr[e^]st) or {Drest}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Dressing}.] [OF. drecier to make straight, raise, set up, prepare, arrange, F. dresser, (assumed) LL. directiare, fr. L. dirigere, directum, to direct;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To dress up — Dress Dress (dr[e^]s), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dressed} (dr[e^]st) or {Drest}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Dressing}.] [OF. drecier to make straight, raise, set up, prepare, arrange, F. dresser, (assumed) LL. directiare, fr. L. dirigere, directum, to direct;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Ship of the line — A ship of the line was a type of naval warship constructed from the 17th century through the mid 19th century, to take part in the the naval tactic known as the line of battle, in which two columns of opposing warships would manoeuvre to bring… …   Wikipedia

  • rig — I. transitive verb (rigged; rigging) Etymology: probably back formation from rigging Date: 15th century 1. to fit out (as a ship) with rigging 2. clothe, dress usually used with out 3. to furnish with special gear ; equip 4 …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Full rigged ship — A full rigged ship or fully rigged ship is a sailing vessel with three or more masts, all of them square rigged. A full rigged ship is said to have a ship rig.Sometimes such a vessel will merely be called a ship , particularly in 18th to early… …   Wikipedia

  • Rotor Ship — A Rotor ship, also known as a Flettner ship, is a ship designed to use the Magnus effect for propulsion. The Magnus effect is a force acting on a spinning body in a moving airstream, which acts perpendicularly to the direction of the airstream.… …   Wikipedia

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