To ride easy
Ride Ride, v. i. [imp. {Rode} (r[=o]d) ({Rid} [r[i^]d], archaic); p. p. {Ridden}({Rid}, archaic); p. pr. & vb. n. {Riding}.] [AS. r[=i]dan; akin to LG. riden, D. rijden, G. reiten, OHG. r[=i]tan, Icel. r[=i][eth]a, Sw. rida, Dan. ride; cf. L. raeda a carriage, which is from a Celtic word. Cf. {Road}.] 1. To be carried on the back of an animal, as a horse. [1913 Webster]

To-morrow, when ye riden by the way. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

Let your master ride on before, and do you gallop after him. --Swift. [1913 Webster]

2. To be borne in a carriage; as, to ride in a coach, in a car, and the like. See Synonym, below. [1913 Webster]

The richest inhabitants exhibited their wealth, not by riding in gilden carriages, but by walking the streets with trains of servants. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

3. To be borne or in a fluid; to float; to lie. [1913 Webster]

Men once walked where ships at anchor ride. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

4. To be supported in motion; to rest. [1913 Webster]

Strong as the exletree On which heaven rides. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

On whose foolish honesty My practices ride easy! --Shak. [1913 Webster]

5. To manage a horse, as an equestrian. [1913 Webster]

He rode, he fenced, he moved with graceful ease. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

6. To support a rider, as a horse; to move under the saddle; as, a horse rides easy or hard, slow or fast. [1913 Webster]

{To ride easy} (Naut.), to lie at anchor without violent pitching or straining at the cables.

{To ride hard} (Naut.), to pitch violently.

{To ride out}. (a) To go upon a military expedition. [Obs.] --Chaucer. (b) To ride in the open air. [Colloq.]

{To ride to hounds}, to ride behind, and near to, the hounds in hunting. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Drive.

Usage: {Ride}, {Drive}. Ride originally meant (and is so used throughout the English Bible) to be carried on horseback or in a vehicle of any kind. At present in England, drive is the word applied in most cases to progress in a carriage; as, a drive around the park, etc.; while ride is appropriated to progress on a horse. Johnson seems to sanction this distinction by giving ``to travel on horseback'' as the leading sense of ride; though he adds ``to travel in a vehicle'' as a secondary sense. This latter use of the word still occurs to some extent; as, the queen rides to Parliament in her coach of state; to ride in an omnibus. [1913 Webster]

``Will you ride over or drive?'' said Lord Willowby to his quest, after breakfast that morning. --W. Black. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To ride hard — Ride Ride, v. i. [imp. {Rode} (r[=o]d) ({Rid} [r[i^]d], archaic); p. p. {Ridden}({Rid}, archaic); p. pr. & vb. n. {Riding}.] [AS. r[=i]dan; akin to LG. riden, D. rijden, G. reiten, OHG. r[=i]tan, Icel. r[=i][eth]a, Sw. rida, Dan. ride; cf. L.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To ride out — Ride Ride, v. i. [imp. {Rode} (r[=o]d) ({Rid} [r[i^]d], archaic); p. p. {Ridden}({Rid}, archaic); p. pr. & vb. n. {Riding}.] [AS. r[=i]dan; akin to LG. riden, D. rijden, G. reiten, OHG. r[=i]tan, Icel. r[=i][eth]a, Sw. rida, Dan. ride; cf. L.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To ride to hounds — Ride Ride, v. i. [imp. {Rode} (r[=o]d) ({Rid} [r[i^]d], archaic); p. p. {Ridden}({Rid}, archaic); p. pr. & vb. n. {Riding}.] [AS. r[=i]dan; akin to LG. riden, D. rijden, G. reiten, OHG. r[=i]tan, Icel. r[=i][eth]a, Sw. rida, Dan. ride; cf. L.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Ticket to Ride (board game) — Infobox Game subject name = Ticket to Ride image link = image caption = designer = Alan R. Moon publisher = Days of Wonder players = 2–5 ages = 8 and up setup time …   Wikipedia

  • Ride — Ride, v. i. [imp. {Rode} (r[=o]d) ({Rid} [r[i^]d], archaic); p. p. {Ridden}({Rid}, archaic); p. pr. & vb. n. {Riding}.] [AS. r[=i]dan; akin to LG. riden, D. rijden, G. reiten, OHG. r[=i]tan, Icel. r[=i][eth]a, Sw. rida, Dan. ride; cf. L. raeda a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Easy rider (slang) — Easy rider is an arcane United States slang expression whose meaning has varied with time.HistoryOriginsEasy rider originally meant an expert horseman or a horse that was easy to ride. [Harris, Sullivan D. (ed.), The Ohio Cultivator , Columbus,… …   Wikipedia

  • easy - easily — ◊ easy Something that is easy can be done or achieved without effort or difficulty. Both sides had secured easy victories earlier in the day. Competitions in the Spectator are never easy. The comparative and superlative forms of easy are easier… …   Useful english dictionary

  • ride — ride1 W2S2 [raıd] v past tense rode [rəud US roud] past participle ridden [ˈrıdn] ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(animal)¦ 2¦(bicycle/motorbike)¦ 3¦(vehicle)¦ 4¦(in a lift)¦ 5¦(water/air)¦ 6 be riding high 7 let something ride …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • ride — ▪ I. ride ride 1 [raɪd] verb rode PASTTENSE [rəʊd ǁ roʊd] ridden PASTPART [ˈrɪdn] JOURNALISM 1. be riding high to be very successful or confident …   Financial and business terms

  • ride — ride1 [ raıd ] (past tense rode [ roud ] ; past participle rid|den [ rıdn ] ) verb *** ▸ 1 go by horse/bicycle etc. ▸ 2 travel in vehicle ▸ 3 criticize someone annoyingly ▸ 4 take part in race ▸ 5 float on water/in air ▸ + PHRASES 1. )… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

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