To reverse an engine
Reverse Re*verse", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reversed} (r[-e]*v[~e]rst");p. pr. & vb. n. {Reversing}.] [See {Reverse}, a., and cf. {Revert}.] 1. To turn back; to cause to face in a contrary direction; to cause to depart. [1913 Webster]

And that old dame said many an idle verse, Out of her daughter's heart fond fancies to reverse. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

2. To cause to return; to recall. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

And to his fresh remembrance did reverse The ugly view of his deformed crimes. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

3. To change totally; to alter to the opposite. [1913 Webster]

Reverse the doom of death. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

She reversed the conduct of the celebrated vicar of Bray. --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster]

4. To turn upside down; to invert. [1913 Webster]

A pyramid reversed may stand upon his point if balanced by admirable skill. --Sir W. Temple. [1913 Webster]

5. Hence, to overthrow; to subvert. [1913 Webster]

These can divide, and these reverse, the state. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

Custom . . . reverses even the distinctions of good and evil. --Rogers. [1913 Webster]

6. (Law) To overthrow by a contrary decision; to make void; to under or annual for error; as, to reverse a judgment, sentence, or decree. [1913 Webster]

{Reverse arms} (Mil.), a position of a soldier in which the piece passes between the right elbow and the body at an angle of 45[deg], and is held as in the illustration.

{To reverse an engine} or {To reverse a machine}, to cause it to perform its revolutions or action in the opposite direction. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To overturn; overset; invert; overthrow; subvert; repeal; annul; revoke; undo. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To reverse a machine — Reverse Re*verse , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reversed} (r[ e]*v[ e]rst );p. pr. & vb. n. {Reversing}.] [See {Reverse}, a., and cf. {Revert}.] 1. To turn back; to cause to face in a contrary direction; to cause to depart. [1913 Webster] And that old… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Reverse — Re*verse , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reversed} (r[ e]*v[ e]rst );p. pr. & vb. n. {Reversing}.] [See {Reverse}, a., and cf. {Revert}.] 1. To turn back; to cause to face in a contrary direction; to cause to depart. [1913 Webster] And that old dame said… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Reverse arms — Reverse Re*verse , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reversed} (r[ e]*v[ e]rst );p. pr. & vb. n. {Reversing}.] [See {Reverse}, a., and cf. {Revert}.] 1. To turn back; to cause to face in a contrary direction; to cause to depart. [1913 Webster] And that old… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • reverse — reversedly /ri verr sid lee, verrst lee/, adv. reversely, adv. reverser, n. /ri verrs /, adj., n., v., reversed, reversing. adj. 1. opposite or contrary in position, direction, order, or character: an impression reverse to what was intended; in… …   Universalium

  • reverse — re•verse [[t]rɪˈvɜrs[/t]] adj. n. v. versed, vers•ing 1) opposite or contrary in position, direction, order, or character 2) with the back or rear part toward the observer: the reverse side of a fabric[/ex] 3) mac mec pertaining to or producing… …   From formal English to slang

  • Reverse engineering — is the process of discovering the technological principles of a device, object, or system through analysis of its structure, function, and operation. It often involves taking something (e.g., a mechanical device, electronic component, software… …   Wikipedia

  • reverse — ► VERB 1) move backwards. 2) make (something) the opposite of what it was. 3) turn the other way round or up or inside out. 4) revoke or annul (a judgement by a lower court or authority). 5) (of an engine) work in a contrary direction. ►… …   English terms dictionary

  • Reverse-flow cylinder head — A reverse flow or non crossflow cylinder head is one that locates the intake and exhaust ports on the same side of the engine. The gases can be thought to enter the cylinder head and then change direction in order to exit the head. This is in… …   Wikipedia

  • reverse — I. adjective Etymology: Middle English revers, from Anglo French, from Latin reversus, past participle of revertere to turn back more at revert Date: 14th century 1. a. opposite or contrary to a previous or normal condition < reverse order > b.… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Reverse osmosis — Schematics of a reverse osmosis system (desalination) using a pressure exchanger. 1: Sea water inflow, 2: Fresh water …   Wikipedia

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