To report one's self
Report Re*port" (r?-p?rt"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reported}; p. pr. & vb. n. Reporting.] [F. reporter to carry back, carry (cf. rapporter; see {Rapport}), L. reportare to bear or bring back; pref. re- re- + portare to bear or bring. See {Port} bearing, demeanor.] 1. To refer. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Baldwin, his son, . . . succeeded his father; so like unto him that we report the reader to the character of King Almeric, and will spare the repeating his description. --Fuller. [1913 Webster]

2. To bring back, as an answer; to announce in return; to relate, as what has been discovered by a person sent to examine, explore, or investigate; as, a messenger reports to his employer what he has seen or ascertained; the committee reported progress. [1913 Webster]

There is no man that may reporten all. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

3. To give an account of; to relate; to tell; to circulate publicly, as a story; as, in the common phrase, it is reported. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

It is reported among the heathen, and Gashmu saith it, that thou and the Jews think to rebel. --Neh. vi. 6. [1913 Webster]

4. To give an official account or statement of; as, a treasurer reports the receipts and expenditures. [1913 Webster]

5. To return or repeat, as sound; to echo. [Obs. or R.] ``A church with windows only from above, that reporteth the voice thirteen times.'' --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

6. (Parliamentary Practice) To return or present as the result of an examination or consideration of any matter officially referred; as, the committee reported the bill witth amendments, or reported a new bill, or reported the results of an inquiry. [1913 Webster]

7. To make minutes of, as a speech, or the doings of a public body; to write down from the lips of a speaker. [1913 Webster]

8. To write an account of for publication, as in a newspaper; as, to report a public celebration or a horse race. [1913 Webster]

9. To make a statement of the conduct of, especially in an unfavorable sense; as, to report a servant to his employer. [1913 Webster]

{To be reported}, or {To be reported of}, to be spoken of; to be mentioned, whether favorably or unfavorably. --Acts xvi. 2.

{To report one's self}, to betake one's self, as to a superior or one to whom service is due, and be in readiness to receive orders or do service. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To relate; narrate; tell; recite; describe. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Report — Re*port (r? p?rt ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reported}; p. pr. & vb. n. Reporting.] [F. reporter to carry back, carry (cf. rapporter; see {Rapport}), L. reportare to bear or bring back; pref. re re + portare to bear or bring. See {Port} bearing,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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