To reckon without one's host
Reckon Reck"on, v. i. 1. To make an enumeration or computation; to engage in numbering or computing. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To come to an accounting; to make up accounts; to settle; to examine and strike the balance of debt and credit; to adjust relations of desert or penalty. [1913 Webster]

``Parfay,'' sayst thou, ``sometime he reckon shall.'' --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

{To reckon for}, to answer for; to pay the account for. ``If they fail in their bounden duty, they shall reckon for it one day.'' --Bp. Sanderson.

{To reckon on} {To reckon upon}, to count or depend on; to include as a factor within one's considerations.

{To reckon with}, (a) to settle accounts or claims with; -- used literally or figuratively. (b) to include as a factor in one's plans or calculations; to anticipate. (c) to deal with; to handle; as, I have to reckon with raising three children as well as doing my job. [1913 Webster +PJC]

After a long time the lord of those servants cometh, and reckoneth with them. --Matt. xxv. 19. [1913 Webster]

{To reckon without one's host}, to ignore in a calculation or arrangement the person whose assent is essential; hence, to reckon erroneously. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To reckon for — Reckon Reck on, v. i. 1. To make an enumeration or computation; to engage in numbering or computing. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To come to an accounting; to make up accounts; to settle; to examine and strike the balance of debt and credit; to adjust …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To reckon on — Reckon Reck on, v. i. 1. To make an enumeration or computation; to engage in numbering or computing. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To come to an accounting; to make up accounts; to settle; to examine and strike the balance of debt and credit; to adjust …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To reckon upon — Reckon Reck on, v. i. 1. To make an enumeration or computation; to engage in numbering or computing. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To come to an accounting; to make up accounts; to settle; to examine and strike the balance of debt and credit; to adjust …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To reckon with — Reckon Reck on, v. i. 1. To make an enumeration or computation; to engage in numbering or computing. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To come to an accounting; to make up accounts; to settle; to examine and strike the balance of debt and credit; to adjust …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Reckon — Reck on, v. i. 1. To make an enumeration or computation; to engage in numbering or computing. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To come to an accounting; to make up accounts; to settle; to examine and strike the balance of debt and credit; to adjust… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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