To raise a blockade
Blockade Block*ade", n. [Cf. It. bloccata. See {Block}, v. t. ] 1. The shutting up of a place by troops or ships, with the purpose of preventing ingress or egress, or the reception of supplies; as, the blockade of the ports of an enemy. [1913 Webster]

Note: Blockade is now usually applied to an investment with ships or vessels, while siege is used of an investment by land forces. To constitute a blockade, the investing power must be able to apply its force to every point of practicable access, so as to render it dangerous to attempt to enter; and there is no blockade of that port where its force can not be brought to bear. --Kent. [1913 Webster]

2. An obstruction to passage. [1913 Webster]

3. (physiology) interference with transmission of a physiological signal, or a physiological reaction. [PJC]

{To raise a blockade}. See under {Raise}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To raise a blockade — Raise Raise (r[=a]z), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Raised} (r[=a]zd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Raising}.] [OE. reisen, Icel. reisa, causative of r[=i]sa to rise. See {Rise}, and cf. {Rear} to raise.] [1913 Webster] 1. To cause to rise; to bring from a lower to a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To raise a check — Raise Raise (r[=a]z), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Raised} (r[=a]zd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Raising}.] [OE. reisen, Icel. reisa, causative of r[=i]sa to rise. See {Rise}, and cf. {Rear} to raise.] [1913 Webster] 1. To cause to rise; to bring from a lower to a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To raise a siege — Raise Raise (r[=a]z), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Raised} (r[=a]zd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Raising}.] [OE. reisen, Icel. reisa, causative of r[=i]sa to rise. See {Rise}, and cf. {Rear} to raise.] [1913 Webster] 1. To cause to rise; to bring from a lower to a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To raise Cain — Raise Raise (r[=a]z), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Raised} (r[=a]zd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Raising}.] [OE. reisen, Icel. reisa, causative of r[=i]sa to rise. See {Rise}, and cf. {Rear} to raise.] [1913 Webster] 1. To cause to rise; to bring from a lower to a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To raise steam — Raise Raise (r[=a]z), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Raised} (r[=a]zd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Raising}.] [OE. reisen, Icel. reisa, causative of r[=i]sa to rise. See {Rise}, and cf. {Rear} to raise.] [1913 Webster] 1. To cause to rise; to bring from a lower to a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To raise the devil — Raise Raise (r[=a]z), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Raised} (r[=a]zd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Raising}.] [OE. reisen, Icel. reisa, causative of r[=i]sa to rise. See {Rise}, and cf. {Rear} to raise.] [1913 Webster] 1. To cause to rise; to bring from a lower to a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To raise the wind — Raise Raise (r[=a]z), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Raised} (r[=a]zd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Raising}.] [OE. reisen, Icel. reisa, causative of r[=i]sa to rise. See {Rise}, and cf. {Rear} to raise.] [1913 Webster] 1. To cause to rise; to bring from a lower to a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Raise — (r[=a]z), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Raised} (r[=a]zd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Raising}.] [OE. reisen, Icel. reisa, causative of r[=i]sa to rise. See {Rise}, and cf. {Rear} to raise.] [1913 Webster] 1. To cause to rise; to bring from a lower to a higher… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Blockade — Block*ade , n. [Cf. It. bloccata. See {Block}, v. t. ] 1. The shutting up of a place by troops or ships, with the purpose of preventing ingress or egress, or the reception of supplies; as, the blockade of the ports of an enemy. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • blockade — n Blockade, siege are comparable when denoting an attempt of a belligerent force to break down the resistance of the enemy by preventing egress or ingress of men or entrance of supplies over a considerable period of time. Blockade is used chiefly …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

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