To put to flight
Flight Flight (fl[imac]t), n. [AS. fliht, flyht, a flying, fr. fle['o]gan to fly; cf. flyht a fleeing, fr. fle['o]n to flee, G. flucht a fleeing, Sw. flykt, G. flug a flying, Sw. flygt, D. vlugt a fleeing or flying, Dan. flugt. [root]84. See {Flee}, {Fly}.] 1. The act of flying; a passing through the air by the help of wings; volitation; mode or style of flying. [1913 Webster]

Like the night owl's lazy flight. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. The act of fleeing; the act of running away, to escape danger or expected evil; hasty departure. [1913 Webster]

Pray ye that your flight be not in the winter. --Matt. xxiv. 20. [1913 Webster]

Fain by flight to save themselves. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. Lofty elevation and excursion; a mounting; a soaring; as, a flight of imagination, ambition, folly. [1913 Webster]

Could he have kept his spirit to that flight, He had been happy. --Byron. [1913 Webster]

His highest flights were indeed far below those of Taylor. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

4. A number of beings or things passing through the air together; especially, a flock of birds flying in company; the birds that fly or migrate together; the birds produced in one season; as, a flight of arrows. --Swift. [1913 Webster]

Swift flights of angels ministrant. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

Like a flight of fowl Scattered winds and tempestuous gusts. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

5. A series of steps or stairs from one landing to another. --Parker. [1913 Webster]

6. A kind of arrow for the longbow; also, the sport of shooting with it. See {Shaft}. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Challenged Cupid at the flight. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Not a flight drawn home E'er made that haste that they have. --Beau. & Fl. [1913 Webster]

7. The husk or glume of oats. [Prov. Eng.] --Wright. [1913 Webster]

8. a trip made by or in a flying vehicle, as an airplane, spacecraft, or aeronautical balloon. [PJC]

9. A scheduled flight[8] on a commercial airline; as, the next flight leaves at 8 o'clock. [PJC]

{Flight feathers} (Zo["o]l.), the wing feathers of a bird, including the quills, coverts, and bastard wing. See {Bird}.

{To put to flight}, {To turn to flight}, to compel to run away; to force to flee; to rout.

{to take a flight[9]}, to make a trip in an airplane, especially a scheduled flight[9]. [1913 Webster + PJC]

Syn: Pair; set. See {Pair}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To put to rout — Rout Rout, n. [OF. route, LL. rupta, properly, a breaking, fr. L. ruptus, p. p. of rumpere to break. See {Rupture}, {reave}, and cf. {Rote} repetition of forms, {Route}. In some senses this word has been confused with rout a bellowing, an… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To turn to flight — Flight Flight (fl[imac]t), n. [AS. fliht, flyht, a flying, fr. fle[ o]gan to fly; cf. flyht a fleeing, fr. fle[ o]n to flee, G. flucht a fleeing, Sw. flykt, G. flug a flying, Sw. flygt, D. vlugt a fleeing or flying, Dan. flugt. [root]84. See… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • put to flight — To make flee • • • Main Entry: ↑flight * * * put (someone) to flight formal + old fashioned : to cause (someone) to leave or run away The rebels were put to flight by the advancing army. • • • Main Entry: ↑flight …   Useful english dictionary

  • put to flight — index repel (drive back), repulse Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • put to rout — put to flight; defeat utterly I once put a gang to rout …   Useful english dictionary

  • put to rout — put to flight; defeat utterly. → rout …   English new terms dictionary

  • To put one's back up — Back Back (b[a^]k), n. [AS. b[ae]c, bac; akin to Icel., Sw., & LG. bak, Dan. bag; cf. OHG. bahho ham, Skr. bhaj to turn, OSlav. b[=e]g[u^] flight. Cf. {Bacon}.] 1. In human beings, the hinder part of the body, extending from the neck to the end… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • put to — phr verb Put to is used with these nouns as the object: ↑bed, ↑bother, ↑death, ↑expense, ↑flight, ↑inconvenience, ↑music, ↑proposition, ↑referendum, ↑rout, ↑sea, ↑ …   Collocations dictionary

  • put to flight — idi to force to flee or run away; rout …   From formal English to slang

  • put to flight — Cause to flee, scatter in flight …   New dictionary of synonyms

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