To put one's foot in one's mouth
Mouth Mouth (mouth), n.; pl. {Mouths} (mou[th]z). [OE. mouth, mu[thorn], AS. m[=u][eth]; akin to D. mond, OS. m[=u][eth], G. mund, Icel. mu[eth]r, munnr, Sw. mun, Dan. mund, Goth. mun[thorn]s, and possibly L. mentum chin; or cf. D. muil mouth, muzzle, G. maul, OHG. m[=u]la, Icel. m[=u]li, and Skr. mukha mouth.] 1. The opening through which an animal receives food; the aperture between the jaws or between the lips; also, the cavity, containing the tongue and teeth, between the lips and the pharynx; the buccal cavity. [1913 Webster]

2. Hence: An opening affording entrance or exit; orifice; aperture; as: (a) The opening of a vessel by which it is filled or emptied, charged or discharged; as, the mouth of a jar or pitcher; the mouth of the lacteal vessels, etc. (b) The opening or entrance of any cavity, as a cave, pit, well, or den. (c) The opening of a piece of ordnance, through which it is discharged. (d) The opening through which the waters of a river or any stream are discharged. (e) The entrance into a harbor. [1913 Webster]

3. (Saddlery) The crosspiece of a bridle bit, which enters the mouth of an animal. [1913 Webster]

4. A principal speaker; one who utters the common opinion; a mouthpiece. [1913 Webster]

Every coffeehouse has some particular statesman belonging to it, who is the mouth of the street where he lives. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

5. Cry; voice. [Obs.] --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

6. Speech; language; testimony. [1913 Webster]

That in the mouth of two or three witnesses every word may be established. --Matt. xviii. 16. [1913 Webster]

7. A wry face; a grimace; a mow. [1913 Webster]

Counterfeit sad looks, Make mouths upon me when I turn my back. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{Down at the mouth} or {Down in the mouth}, chapfallen; of dejected countenance; depressed; discouraged. [Obs. or Colloq.]

{Mouth friend}, one who professes friendship insincerely. --Shak.

{Mouth glass}, a small mirror for inspecting the mouth or teeth.

{Mouth honor}, honor given in words, but not felt. --Shak.

{Mouth organ}. (Mus.) (a) Pan's pipes. See {Pandean}. (b) An harmonicon.

{Mouth pipe}, an organ pipe with a lip or plate to cut the escaping air and make a sound.

{To stop the mouth}, to silence or be silent; to put to shame; to confound.

{To put one's foot in one's mouth}, to say something which causes one embarrassment.

{To run off at the mouth}, to speak excessively.

{To talk out of both sides of one's mouth}, to say things which are contradictory. [1913 Webster +PJC]

The mouth of them that speak lies shall be stopped. --Ps. lxiii. 11. [1913 Webster]

Whose mouths must be stopped. --Titus i. 11. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • put\ one's\ foot\ in\ one's\ mouth — • put one s foot in it • put one s foot in one s mouth v. phr. informal To speak carelessly and rudely; hurt another s feelings without intending to; make a rude mistake. He put his foot in it with his remark about self made men because Jones was …   Словарь американских идиом

  • put one's foot in one's mouth — idi put one s foot in one s mouth, to make an embarrassing blunder …   From formal English to slang

  • put one's foot in one's mouth — verb To misspeak; to say something embarrassing or wrong. I really put my foot in my mouth during the interview. See Also: foot in mouth disease …   Wiktionary

  • put one's foot in one's mouth — say something that is the wrong thing to say in a situation He really put his foot in his mouth when he told her about the surprise party …   Idioms and examples

  • put one's foot in one's mouth — phrasal to make a tactless or embarrassing blunder …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • put one's foot in it — or[put one s foot in one s mouth] {v. phr.}, {informal} To speak carelessly and rudely; hurt another s feelings without intending to; make a rude mistake. * /He put his foot in it with his remark about self made men because Jones was one of… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • put one's foot in it — or[put one s foot in one s mouth] {v. phr.}, {informal} To speak carelessly and rudely; hurt another s feelings without intending to; make a rude mistake. * /He put his foot in it with his remark about self made men because Jones was one of… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • put\ one's\ foot\ in\ it — • put one s foot in it • put one s foot in one s mouth v. phr. informal To speak carelessly and rudely; hurt another s feelings without intending to; make a rude mistake. He put his foot in it with his remark about self made men because Jones was …   Словарь американских идиом

  • put one's foot in it — (informal) To spoil anything by some tactless blunder or remark • • • Main Entry: ↑foot * * * put one s foot in it (or put one s foot in one s mouth) informal say or do something tactless or embarrassing; commit a blunder or indiscretion …   Useful english dictionary

  • To put the best foot foremost — Foot Foot (f[oo^]t), n.; pl. {Feet} (f[=e]t). [OE. fot, foot, pl. fet, feet. AS. f[=o]t, pl. f[=e]t; akin to D. voet, OHG. fuoz, G. fuss, Icel. f[=o]tr, Sw. fot, Dan. fod, Goth. f[=o]tus, L. pes, Gr. poy s, Skr. p[=a]d, Icel. fet step, pace… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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