To put in for
Put Put (put; often p[u^]t in def. 3), v. i. 1. To go or move; as, when the air first puts up. [Obs.] --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

2. To steer; to direct one's course; to go. [1913 Webster]

His fury thus appeased, he puts to land. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

3. To play a card or a hand in the game called put. [1913 Webster]

{To put about} (Naut.), to change direction; to tack.

{To put back} (Naut.), to turn back; to return. ``The French . . . had put back to Toulon.'' --Southey.

{To put forth}. (a) To shoot, bud, or germinate. ``Take earth from under walls where nettles put forth.'' --Bacon. (b) To leave a port or haven, as a ship. --Shak.

{To put in} (Naut.), to enter a harbor; to sail into port.

{To put in for}. (a) To make a request or claim; as, to put in for a share of profits. (b) To go into covert; -- said of a bird escaping from a hawk. (c) To offer one's self; to stand as a candidate for. --Locke.

{To put off}, to go away; to depart; esp., to leave land, as a ship; to move from the shore.

{To put on}, to hasten motion; to drive vehemently.

{To put over} (Naut.), to sail over or across.

{To put to sea} (Naut.), to set sail; to begin a voyage; to advance into the ocean.

{To put up}. (a) To take lodgings; to lodge. (b) To offer one's self as a candidate. --L'Estrange.

{To put up to}, to advance to. [Obs.] ``With this he put up to my lord.'' --Swift.

{To put up with}. (a) To overlook, or suffer without recompense, punishment, or resentment; as, to put up with an injury or affront. (b) To take without opposition or expressed dissatisfaction; to endure; as, to put up with bad fare. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To go in for — Go Go, v. i. [imp. {Went} (w[e^]nt); p. p. {Gone} (g[o^]n; 115); p. pr. & vb. n. {Going}. Went comes from the AS, wendan. See {Wend}, v. i.] [OE. gan, gon, AS. g[=a]n, akin to D. gaan, G. gehn, gehen, OHG. g[=e]n, g[=a]n, SW. g[*a], Dan. gaae; cf …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put in — Put Put (put; often p[u^]t in def. 3), v. i. 1. To go or move; as, when the air first puts up. [Obs.] Bacon. [1913 Webster] 2. To steer; to direct one s course; to go. [1913 Webster] His fury thus appeased, he puts to land. Dryden. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put in — Put Put, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Put}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Putting}.] [AS. potian to thrust: cf. Dan. putte to put, to put into, Fries. putje; perh. akin to W. pwtio to butt, poke, thrust; cf. also Gael. put to push, thrust, and E. potter, v. i.] 1. To …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To be in for it — In In, prep. [AS. in; akin to D. & G. in, Icel. [=i], Sw. & Dan. i, OIr. & L. in, Gr. en. [root]197. Cf. 1st {In }, {Inn}.] The specific signification of in is situation or place with respect to surrounding, environment, encompassment, etc. It is …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put in pledge — Pledge Pledge, n. [OF. plege, pleige, pledge, guaranty, LL. plegium, plivium; akin to OF. plevir to bail, guaranty, perhaps fr. L. praebere to proffer, offer (sc. fidem a trust, a promise of security), but cf. also E. play. [root]28. Cf.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put in possession — Possession Pos*ses sion, n. [F. possession, L. possessio.] 1. The act or state of possessing, or holding as one s own. [1913 Webster] 2. (Law) The having, holding, or detention of property in one s power or command; actual seizin or occupancy;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put in one's oar — Oar Oar ([=o]r), n [AS. [=a]r; akin to Icel. [=a]r, Dan. aare, Sw. [*a]ra; perh. akin to E. row, v. Cf. {Rowlock}.] [1913 Webster] 1. An implement for impelling a boat, being a slender piece of timber, usually ash or spruce, with a grip or handle …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put in an appearance — Appearance Ap*pear ance, n. [F. apparence, L. apparentia, fr. apparere. See {Appear}.] 1. The act of appearing or coming into sight; the act of becoming visible to the eye; as, his sudden appearance surprised me. [1913 Webster] 2. A thing seed; a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To lay wait for — Lay Lay (l[=a]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Laid} (l[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Laying}.] [OE. leggen, AS. lecgan, causative, fr. licgan to lie; akin to D. leggen, G. legen, Icel. leggja, Goth. lagjan. See {Lie} to be prostrate.] 1. To cause to lie down,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To stand up for — Stand Stand (st[a^]nd), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Stood} (st[oo^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Standing}.] [OE. standen; AS. standan; akin to OFries. stonda, st[=a]n, D. staan, OS. standan, st[=a]n, OHG. stantan, st[=a]n, G. stehen, Icel. standa, Dan. staae,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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