To pull up
Pull Pull, v. i. To exert one's self in an act or motion of drawing or hauling; to tug; as, to pull at a rope. [1913 Webster]

{To pull apart}, to become separated by pulling; as, a rope will pull apart.

{To pull up}, to draw the reins; to stop; to halt.

{To pull through}, to come successfully to the end of a difficult undertaking, a dangerous sickness, or the like. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • to pluck up — Pluck Pluck, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Plucked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Plucking}.] [AS. pluccian; akin to LG. & D. plukken, G. pfl[ u]cken, Icel. plokka, plukka, Dan. plukke, Sw. plocka. ?27.] 1. To pull; to draw. [1913 Webster] Its own nature . . . plucks …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To tear up — Tear Tear (t[^a]r), v. t. [imp. {Tore} (t[=o]r), ((Obs. {Tare}) (t[^a]r); p. p. {Torn} (t[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. {Tearing}.] [OE. teren, AS. teran; akin to OS. farterian to destroy, D. teren to consume, G. zerren to pull, to tear, zehren to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To draw up — draw draw (dr[add]), v. t. [imp. {Drew} (dr[udd]); p. p. {Drawn} (dr[add]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Drawing}.] [OE. dra[yogh]en, drahen, draien, drawen, AS. dragan; akin to Icel. & Sw. draga, Dan. drage to draw, carry, and prob. to OS. dragan to bear,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take up — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pick up — Pick Pick (p[i^]k), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Picked} (p[i^]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Picking}.] [OE. picken, pikken, to prick, peck; akin to Icel. pikka, Sw. picka, Dan. pikke, D. pikken, G. picken, F. piquer, W. pigo. Cf. {Peck}, v., {Pike}, {Pitch} to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hitch up — Hitch Hitch, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Hitched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Hitching}.] 1. To hook; to catch or fasten as by a hook or a knot; to make fast, unite, or yoke; as, to hitch a horse, or a halter; hitch your wagon to a star. [1913 Webster +PJC] 2. To …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To tie up — Tie Tie, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Tied}(Obs. {Tight}); p. pr. & vb. n. {Tying}.] [OE. ti?en, teyen, AS. t[=i]gan, ti[ e]gan, fr. te[ a]g, te[ a]h, a rope; akin to Icel. taug, and AS. te[ o]n to draw, to pull. See {Tug}, v. t., and cf. {Tow} to drag.] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pull up stakes — {v. phr.}, {informal} To leave the place where you have been living. * /We are going to pull up stakes and move to California./ * /The Jones family pulled up stakes three times in two years./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • pull up stakes — {v. phr.}, {informal} To leave the place where you have been living. * /We are going to pull up stakes and move to California./ * /The Jones family pulled up stakes three times in two years./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • To pull apart — Pull Pull, v. i. To exert one s self in an act or motion of drawing or hauling; to tug; as, to pull at a rope. [1913 Webster] {To pull apart}, to become separated by pulling; as, a rope will pull apart. {To pull up}, to draw the reins; to stop;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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