To pull off
Pull Pull, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pulled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pulling}.] [AS. pullian; cf. LG. pulen, and Gael. peall, piol, spiol.] 1. To draw, or attempt to draw, toward one; to draw forcibly. [1913 Webster]

Ne'er pull your hat upon your brows. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

He put forth his hand . . . and pulled her in. --Gen. viii. 9. [1913 Webster]

2. To draw apart; to tear; to rend. [1913 Webster]

He hath turned aside my ways, and pulled me in pieces; he hath made me desolate. --Lam. iii. 11. [1913 Webster]

3. To gather with the hand, or by drawing toward one; to pluck; as, to pull fruit; to pull flax; to pull a finch. [1913 Webster]

4. To move or operate by the motion of drawing towards one; as, to pull a bell; to pull an oar. [1913 Webster]

5. (Horse Racing) To hold back, and so prevent from winning; as, the favorite was pulled. [1913 Webster]

6. (Print.) To take or make, as a proof or impression; -- hand presses being worked by pulling a lever. [1913 Webster]

7. (Cricket) To strike the ball in a particular manner. See {Pull}, n., 8. [1913 Webster]

Never pull a straight fast ball to leg. --R. H. Lyttelton. [1913 Webster]

{To pull and haul}, to draw hither and thither. `` Both are equally pulled and hauled to do that which they are unable to do. '' --South.

{To pull down}, to demolish; to destroy; to degrade; as, to pull down a house. `` In political affairs, as well as mechanical, it is easier to pull down than build up.'' --Howell. `` To raise the wretched, and pull down the proud.'' --Roscommon.

{To pull a finch}. See under {Finch}.

{To pull off}, take or draw off. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To pull off — Снимать, стаскивать …   Краткий толковый словарь по полиграфии

  • to pluck off — Pluck Pluck, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Plucked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Plucking}.] [AS. pluccian; akin to LG. & D. plukken, G. pfl[ u]cken, Icel. plokka, plukka, Dan. plukke, Sw. plocka. ?27.] 1. To pull; to draw. [1913 Webster] Its own nature . . . plucks …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To tear off — Tear Tear (t[^a]r), v. t. [imp. {Tore} (t[=o]r), ((Obs. {Tare}) (t[^a]r); p. p. {Torn} (t[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. {Tearing}.] [OE. teren, AS. teran; akin to OS. farterian to destroy, D. teren to consume, G. zerren to pull, to tear, zehren to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To draw off — draw draw (dr[add]), v. t. [imp. {Drew} (dr[udd]); p. p. {Drawn} (dr[add]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Drawing}.] [OE. dra[yogh]en, drahen, draien, drawen, AS. dragan; akin to Icel. & Sw. draga, Dan. drage to draw, carry, and prob. to OS. dragan to bear,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pick off — Pick Pick (p[i^]k), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Picked} (p[i^]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Picking}.] [OE. picken, pikken, to prick, peck; akin to Icel. pikka, Sw. picka, Dan. pikke, D. pikken, G. picken, F. piquer, W. pigo. Cf. {Peck}, v., {Pike}, {Pitch} to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To haul off — Haul Haul, v. i. 1. (Naut.) To change the direction of a ship by hauling the wind. See under {Haul}, v. t. [1913 Webster] I . . . hauled up for it, and found it to be an island. Cook. [1913 Webster] 2. To pull apart, as oxen sometimes do when… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pull a finch — Pull Pull, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pulled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pulling}.] [AS. pullian; cf. LG. pulen, and Gael. peall, piol, spiol.] 1. To draw, or attempt to draw, toward one; to draw forcibly. [1913 Webster] Ne er pull your hat upon your brows.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pull and haul — Pull Pull, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pulled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pulling}.] [AS. pullian; cf. LG. pulen, and Gael. peall, piol, spiol.] 1. To draw, or attempt to draw, toward one; to draw forcibly. [1913 Webster] Ne er pull your hat upon your brows.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pull down — Pull Pull, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pulled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pulling}.] [AS. pullian; cf. LG. pulen, and Gael. peall, piol, spiol.] 1. To draw, or attempt to draw, toward one; to draw forcibly. [1913 Webster] Ne er pull your hat upon your brows.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pull off —    American    to refrain improperly from investigating a crime or prosecuting a criminal    From the meaning, to draw back from:     The detectives who were offered all kinds of inducements to pull off... (Lavine, 1930) …   How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

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