To point off
Point Point (point), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pointed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pointing}.] [Cf. F. pointer. See {Point}, n.] 1. To give a point to; to sharpen; to cut, forge, grind, or file to an acute end; as, to point a dart, or a pencil. Used also figuratively; as, to point a moral. [1913 Webster]

2. To direct toward an abject; to aim; as, to point a gun at a wolf, or a cannon at a fort. [1913 Webster]

3. Hence, to direct the attention or notice of. [1913 Webster]

Whosoever should be guided through his battles by Minerva, and pointed to every scene of them. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

4. To supply with punctuation marks; to punctuate; as, to point a composition. [1913 Webster]

5. To mark (a text, as in Arabic or Hebrew) with {vowel points}; -- also called {vocalize}.

Syn: vocalize. [1913 Webster + RP]

6. To give particular prominence to; to designate in a special manner; to indicate, as if by pointing; as, the error was pointed out. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

He points it, however, by no deviation from his straightforward manner of speech. --Dickens. [1913 Webster]

7. To indicate or discover by a fixed look, as game. [1913 Webster]

8. (Masonry) To fill up and finish the joints of (a wall), by introducing additional cement or mortar, and bringing it to a smooth surface. [1913 Webster]

9. (Stone Cutting) To cut, as a surface, with a pointed tool. [1913 Webster]

{To point a rope} (Naut.), to taper and neatly finish off the end by interweaving the nettles.

{To point a sail} (Naut.), to affix points through the eyelet holes of the reefs.

{To point off}, to divide into periods or groups, or to separate, by pointing, as figures.

{To point the yards} (of a vessel) (Naut.), to brace them so that the wind shall strike the sails obliquely. --Totten. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To turn off — Turn Turn (t[^u]rn), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Turned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Turning}.] [OE. turnen, tournen, OF. tourner, torner, turner, F. tourner, LL. tornare, fr. L. tornare to turn in a lathe, to rounds off, fr. tornus a lathe, Gr. ? a turner s… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To fall off — Fall Fall (f[add]l), v. i. [imp. {Fell} (f[e^]l); p. p. {Fallen} (f[add]l n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Falling}.] [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To go off — Go Go, v. i. [imp. {Went} (w[e^]nt); p. p. {Gone} (g[o^]n; 115); p. pr. & vb. n. {Going}. Went comes from the AS, wendan. See {Wend}, v. i.] [OE. gan, gon, AS. g[=a]n, akin to D. gaan, G. gehn, gehen, OHG. g[=e]n, g[=a]n, SW. g[*a], Dan. gaae; cf …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To set off — Set Set (s[e^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Set}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Setting}.] [OE. setten, AS. setton; akin to OS. settian, OFries. setta, D. zetten, OHG. sezzen, G. setzen, Icel. setja, Sw. s[ a]tta, Dan. s?tte, Goth. satjan; causative from the root… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To turn off — Turn Turn, v. i. 1. To move round; to have a circular motion; to revolve entirely, repeatedly, or partially; to change position, so as to face differently; to whirl or wheel round; as, a wheel turns on its axis; a spindle turns on a pivot; a man… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To carry off — Carry Car ry, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Carried}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Carrying}.] [OF. carier, charier, F. carrier, to cart, from OF. car, char, F. car, car. See {Car}.] 1. To convey or transport in any manner from one place to another; to bear; often… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hit off — Hit Hit, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Hit}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Hitting}.] [OE. hitten, hutten, of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. hitte to hit, find, Sw. & Icel. hitta.] 1. To reach with a stroke or blow; to strike or touch, usually with force; especially, to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pass off — Pass Pass, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Passed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Passing}.] [F. passer, LL. passare, fr. L. passus step, or from pandere, passum, to spread out, lay open. See {Pace}.] 1. To go; to move; to proceed; to be moved or transferred from one… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pick off — Pick Pick (p[i^]k), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Picked} (p[i^]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Picking}.] [OE. picken, pikken, to prick, peck; akin to Icel. pikka, Sw. picka, Dan. pikke, D. pikken, G. picken, F. piquer, W. pigo. Cf. {Peck}, v., {Pike}, {Pitch} to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To bear off — Bear Bear (b[^a]r), v. i. 1. To produce, as fruit; to be fruitful, in opposition to barrenness. [1913 Webster] This age to blossom, and the next to bear. Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. To suffer, as in carrying a burden. [1913 Webster] But man is born …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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