To point a rope
Point Point (point), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pointed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pointing}.] [Cf. F. pointer. See {Point}, n.] 1. To give a point to; to sharpen; to cut, forge, grind, or file to an acute end; as, to point a dart, or a pencil. Used also figuratively; as, to point a moral. [1913 Webster]

2. To direct toward an abject; to aim; as, to point a gun at a wolf, or a cannon at a fort. [1913 Webster]

3. Hence, to direct the attention or notice of. [1913 Webster]

Whosoever should be guided through his battles by Minerva, and pointed to every scene of them. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

4. To supply with punctuation marks; to punctuate; as, to point a composition. [1913 Webster]

5. To mark (a text, as in Arabic or Hebrew) with {vowel points}; -- also called {vocalize}.

Syn: vocalize. [1913 Webster + RP]

6. To give particular prominence to; to designate in a special manner; to indicate, as if by pointing; as, the error was pointed out. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

He points it, however, by no deviation from his straightforward manner of speech. --Dickens. [1913 Webster]

7. To indicate or discover by a fixed look, as game. [1913 Webster]

8. (Masonry) To fill up and finish the joints of (a wall), by introducing additional cement or mortar, and bringing it to a smooth surface. [1913 Webster]

9. (Stone Cutting) To cut, as a surface, with a pointed tool. [1913 Webster]

{To point a rope} (Naut.), to taper and neatly finish off the end by interweaving the nettles.

{To point a sail} (Naut.), to affix points through the eyelet holes of the reefs.

{To point off}, to divide into periods or groups, or to separate, by pointing, as figures.

{To point the yards} (of a vessel) (Naut.), to brace them so that the wind shall strike the sails obliquely. --Totten. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To point a sail — Point Point (point), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pointed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pointing}.] [Cf. F. pointer. See {Point}, n.] 1. To give a point to; to sharpen; to cut, forge, grind, or file to an acute end; as, to point a dart, or a pencil. Used also… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To point off — Point Point (point), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pointed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pointing}.] [Cf. F. pointer. See {Point}, n.] 1. To give a point to; to sharpen; to cut, forge, grind, or file to an acute end; as, to point a dart, or a pencil. Used also… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To point the yards — Point Point (point), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pointed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pointing}.] [Cf. F. pointer. See {Point}, n.] 1. To give a point to; to sharpen; to cut, forge, grind, or file to an acute end; as, to point a dart, or a pencil. Used also… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To strain a point — Strain Strain, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Strained}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Straining}.] [OF. estraindre, estreindre, F. [ e]treindre, L. stringere to draw or bind tight; probably akin to Gr. ? a halter, ? that which is squeezwd out, a drop, or perhaps to E …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To give a person line — Line Line, n. [OE. line, AS. l[=i]ne cable, hawser, prob. from L. linea a linen thread, string, line, fr. linum flax, thread, linen, cable; but the English word was influenced by F. ligne line, from the same L. word linea. See {Linen}.] 1. A… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Who Wants to Be a Superhero? (Season 1) — Who Wants to Be a Superhero? is a reality show hosted by Stan Lee. Contestants dress up as comic book superheroes of their own invention. Each week, Lee challenges the contestants to represent what superheroes are all about . One or more of the… …   Wikipedia

  • Point — (point), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pointed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pointing}.] [Cf. F. pointer. See {Point}, n.] 1. To give a point to; to sharpen; to cut, forge, grind, or file to an acute end; as, to point a dart, or a pencil. Used also figuratively; as …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To strain courtesy — Strain Strain, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Strained}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Straining}.] [OF. estraindre, estreindre, F. [ e]treindre, L. stringere to draw or bind tight; probably akin to Gr. ? a halter, ? that which is squeezwd out, a drop, or perhaps to E …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rope splicing — A line eye spliced to a snap shackle. Rope splicing in ropework is the forming of a semi permanent joint between two ropes or two parts of the same rope by partly untwisting and then interweaving their strands. Splices can be used to form a… …   Wikipedia

  • Rope access — is a form of work positioning, initially developed from techniques used in climbing and caving, which applies practical ropework to allow workers to access difficult to reach locations without the use of scaffolding, cradles or mobile elevated… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”