To pocket a ball
Pocket Pock"et, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pocketed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pocketing}.] 1. To put, or conceal, in the pocket; as, to pocket the change. [1913 Webster]

He would pocket the expense of the license. --Sterne. [1913 Webster]

2. To take clandestinely or fraudulently. [1913 Webster]

He pocketed pay in the names of men who had long been dead. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

{To pocket a ball} (Billiards), to drive a ball into a pocket of the table.

{To pocket an insult}, {affront}, etc., to receive an affront without open resentment, or without seeking redress. ``I must pocket up these wrongs.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To pocket an insult — Pocket Pock et, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pocketed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pocketing}.] 1. To put, or conceal, in the pocket; as, to pocket the change. [1913 Webster] He would pocket the expense of the license. Sterne. [1913 Webster] 2. To take… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pick a bone with — Pick Pick (p[i^]k), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Picked} (p[i^]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Picking}.] [OE. picken, pikken, to prick, peck; akin to Icel. pikka, Sw. picka, Dan. pikke, D. pikken, G. picken, F. piquer, W. pigo. Cf. {Peck}, v., {Pike}, {Pitch} to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pick a quarrel — Pick Pick (p[i^]k), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Picked} (p[i^]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Picking}.] [OE. picken, pikken, to prick, peck; akin to Icel. pikka, Sw. picka, Dan. pikke, D. pikken, G. picken, F. piquer, W. pigo. Cf. {Peck}, v., {Pike}, {Pitch} to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pick a thank — Pick Pick (p[i^]k), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Picked} (p[i^]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Picking}.] [OE. picken, pikken, to prick, peck; akin to Icel. pikka, Sw. picka, Dan. pikke, D. pikken, G. picken, F. piquer, W. pigo. Cf. {Peck}, v., {Pike}, {Pitch} to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pocket — Pock et, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pocketed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pocketing}.] 1. To put, or conceal, in the pocket; as, to pocket the change. [1913 Webster] He would pocket the expense of the license. Sterne. [1913 Webster] 2. To take clandestinely or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pocket — I. noun Etymology: Middle English poket, from Anglo French poket, pochete, diminutive of poke, pouche bag more at pouch Date: 15th century 1. a. a small bag carried by a person ; purse b. a small bag that is sewed or inserted in a garment so that …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Pocket billiards — Pocket billiards, most commonly referred to as pool, is the general term for a family of games played on a specific class of billiards table, having 6 receptacles called pockets (or holes ) along the rails, in which balls are deposited as the… …   Wikipedia

  • Pocket — Pock et (p[o^]k [e^]t), n. [OE. poket, Prov. F. & OF. poquette, F. pochette, dim. fr. poque, pouque, F. poche; probably of Teutonic origin. See {Poke} a pocket, and cf. {Poach} to cook eggs, to plunder, and {Pouch}.] 1. A bag or pouch;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pocket borough — Pocket Pock et (p[o^]k [e^]t), n. [OE. poket, Prov. F. & OF. poquette, F. pochette, dim. fr. poque, pouque, F. poche; probably of Teutonic origin. See {Poke} a pocket, and cf. {Poach} to cook eggs, to plunder, and {Pouch}.] 1. A bag or pouch;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pocket gopher — Pocket Pock et (p[o^]k [e^]t), n. [OE. poket, Prov. F. & OF. poquette, F. pochette, dim. fr. poque, pouque, F. poche; probably of Teutonic origin. See {Poke} a pocket, and cf. {Poach} to cook eggs, to plunder, and {Pouch}.] 1. A bag or pouch;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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