To pocket a ball
Pocket Pock"et, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pocketed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pocketing}.] 1. To put, or conceal, in the pocket; as, to pocket the change. [1913 Webster]

He would pocket the expense of the license. --Sterne. [1913 Webster]

2. To take clandestinely or fraudulently. [1913 Webster]

He pocketed pay in the names of men who had long been dead. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

{To pocket a ball} (Billiards), to drive a ball into a pocket of the table.

{To pocket an insult}, {affront}, etc., to receive an affront without open resentment, or without seeking redress. ``I must pocket up these wrongs.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To pocket an insult — Pocket Pock et, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pocketed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pocketing}.] 1. To put, or conceal, in the pocket; as, to pocket the change. [1913 Webster] He would pocket the expense of the license. Sterne. [1913 Webster] 2. To take… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pick a bone with — Pick Pick (p[i^]k), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Picked} (p[i^]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Picking}.] [OE. picken, pikken, to prick, peck; akin to Icel. pikka, Sw. picka, Dan. pikke, D. pikken, G. picken, F. piquer, W. pigo. Cf. {Peck}, v., {Pike}, {Pitch} to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pick a quarrel — Pick Pick (p[i^]k), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Picked} (p[i^]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Picking}.] [OE. picken, pikken, to prick, peck; akin to Icel. pikka, Sw. picka, Dan. pikke, D. pikken, G. picken, F. piquer, W. pigo. Cf. {Peck}, v., {Pike}, {Pitch} to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pick a thank — Pick Pick (p[i^]k), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Picked} (p[i^]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Picking}.] [OE. picken, pikken, to prick, peck; akin to Icel. pikka, Sw. picka, Dan. pikke, D. pikken, G. picken, F. piquer, W. pigo. Cf. {Peck}, v., {Pike}, {Pitch} to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pocket — Pock et, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pocketed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pocketing}.] 1. To put, or conceal, in the pocket; as, to pocket the change. [1913 Webster] He would pocket the expense of the license. Sterne. [1913 Webster] 2. To take clandestinely or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pocket billiards — pool2 (def. 1). [1910 15] * * * ▪ game also called  Pool,    a billiards game, most popular in the United States and Canada, played with a white cue ball and 15 consecutively numbered coloured balls on a rectangular table with six pockets (one at …   Universalium

  • pocket — pock|et1 [ pakıt ] noun count *** 1. ) a small bag that forms part of a piece of clothing and is used for holding small objects: The money had fallen out of a hole in my pocket. She searched her pockets for the car keys. a pants/shirt/coat pocket …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • pocket — I UK [ˈpɒkɪt] / US [ˈpɑkɪt] noun [countable] Word forms pocket : singular pocket plural pockets *** 1) a small bag that forms part of a piece of clothing and is used for holding small objects The money had fallen out of a hole in my pocket. a… …   English dictionary

  • pocket — 1 noun (C) 1 IN CLOTHES a small bag sewn onto or into a coat, trousers etc so that you can put things such as money or keys into it: Joseph always stands with his hands in his pockets. | coat/trouser/jacket etc pocket: The keys are in my coat… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • pocket — I. noun Etymology: Middle English poket, from Anglo French poket, pochete, diminutive of poke, pouche bag more at pouch Date: 15th century 1. a. a small bag carried by a person ; purse b. a small bag that is sewed or inserted in a garment so that …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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