To pile muskets
Pile Pile, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Piled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Piling}.] 1. To lay or throw into a pile or heap; to heap up; to collect into a mass; to accumulate; to amass; -- often with up; as, to pile up wood. ``Hills piled on hills.'' --Dryden. ``Life piled on life.'' --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

The labor of an age in piled stones. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. To cover with heaps; or in great abundance; to fill or overfill; to load. [1913 Webster]

{To pile arms} {To pile muskets} (Mil.), to place three guns together so that they may stand upright, supporting each other; to stack arms. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To pile arms — Pile Pile, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Piled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Piling}.] 1. To lay or throw into a pile or heap; to heap up; to collect into a mass; to accumulate; to amass; often with up; as, to pile up wood. Hills piled on hills. Dryden. Life piled… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pile — Pile, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Piled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Piling}.] 1. To lay or throw into a pile or heap; to heap up; to collect into a mass; to accumulate; to amass; often with up; as, to pile up wood. Hills piled on hills. Dryden. Life piled on… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pile — I. /paɪl / (say puyl) noun 1. an assemblage of things laid or lying one upon another in a more or less orderly fashion: a pile of boxes. 2. Colloquial a large number, quantity, or amount of anything: a pile of things to do. 3. a heap of wood on… …   Australian English dictionary

  • pile arms — To prop three muskets, orig with fixed bayonets, so that the butts remain firm, the muzzles close together pointing obliquely (also stack arms) • • • Main Entry: ↑pile * * * see at stack …   Useful english dictionary

  • To stack arms — Stack Stack, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Stacked} (st[a^]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Stacking}.] [Cf. Sw. stacka, Dan. stakke. See {Stack}, n.] 1. To lay in a conical or other pile; to make into a large pile; as, to stack hay, cornstalks, or grain; to stack… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • to blow one's stacks — Stack Stack (st[a^]k), n. [Icel. stakkr; akin to Sw. stack, Dan. stak. Cf. {Stake}.] 1. A large and to some degree orderly pile of hay, grain, straw, or the like, usually of a nearly conical form, but sometimes rectangular or oblong, contracted… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Piled — Pile Pile, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Piled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Piling}.] 1. To lay or throw into a pile or heap; to heap up; to collect into a mass; to accumulate; to amass; often with up; as, to pile up wood. Hills piled on hills. Dryden. Life piled… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Piling — Pile Pile, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Piled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Piling}.] 1. To lay or throw into a pile or heap; to heap up; to collect into a mass; to accumulate; to amass; often with up; as, to pile up wood. Hills piled on hills. Dryden. Life piled… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • stack — /stæk / (say stak) noun 1. a large, usually circular or rectangular pile of hay, straw, or the like. 2. any more or less orderly pile or heap. 3. a number of chimneys or flues grouped together. 4. a single chimney or funnel for smoke, or a… …   Australian English dictionary

  • Forest City Stockade — The Forest City Stockade was built to defend the area settlers from Indian attacks. It became famous during the Dakota War of 1862. The following account is taken from Terry Tales 2, a book by Terry R. Shaw: It had been Jesse Branham, Sr.’s son… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”