To pile arms
Pile Pile, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Piled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Piling}.] 1. To lay or throw into a pile or heap; to heap up; to collect into a mass; to accumulate; to amass; -- often with up; as, to pile up wood. ``Hills piled on hills.'' --Dryden. ``Life piled on life.'' --Tennyson. [1913 Webster]

The labor of an age in piled stones. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. To cover with heaps; or in great abundance; to fill or overfill; to load. [1913 Webster]

{To pile arms} {To pile muskets} (Mil.), to place three guns together so that they may stand upright, supporting each other; to stack arms. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To stack arms — Stack Stack, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Stacked} (st[a^]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Stacking}.] [Cf. Sw. stacka, Dan. stakke. See {Stack}, n.] 1. To lay in a conical or other pile; to make into a large pile; as, to stack hay, cornstalks, or grain; to stack… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pile muskets — Pile Pile, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Piled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Piling}.] 1. To lay or throw into a pile or heap; to heap up; to collect into a mass; to accumulate; to amass; often with up; as, to pile up wood. Hills piled on hills. Dryden. Life piled… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pile arms — To prop three muskets, orig with fixed bayonets, so that the butts remain firm, the muzzles close together pointing obliquely (also stack arms) • • • Main Entry: ↑pile * * * see at stack …   Useful english dictionary

  • Pile — Pile, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Piled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Piling}.] 1. To lay or throw into a pile or heap; to heap up; to collect into a mass; to accumulate; to amass; often with up; as, to pile up wood. Hills piled on hills. Dryden. Life piled on… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pile — I. /paɪl / (say puyl) noun 1. an assemblage of things laid or lying one upon another in a more or less orderly fashion: a pile of boxes. 2. Colloquial a large number, quantity, or amount of anything: a pile of things to do. 3. a heap of wood on… …   Australian English dictionary

  • pile — pile1 S2 [paıl] n ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(arrangement of things)¦ 2¦(large amount)¦ 3 a pile of something 4 the bottom of the pile 5 the top of the pile 6¦(house)¦ 7¦(material)¦ 8¦(post)¦ 9 make a/your pile 10 piles …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • pile — 1. n. & v. n. 1 a heap of things laid or gathered upon one another (a pile of leaves). 2 a a large imposing building (a stately pile). b a large group of tall buildings. 3 colloq. a a large quantity. b a large amount of money; a fortune (made his …   Useful english dictionary

  • pile — pile1 noun 1》 a heap of things laid or lying one on top of another.     ↘informal a large amount: the growing pile of work. 2》 a large imposing building: a Gothic pile. 3》 a series of plates of dissimilar metals laid one on another alternately to …   English new terms dictionary

  • Pile — This unusual name is of Anglo Saxon origin, and is a topographical surname given in the first instances to someone who lived near a stake or post which had been placed to serve as a landmark or boundary marker. The derivation is from the Olde… …   Surnames reference

  • to blow one's stacks — Stack Stack (st[a^]k), n. [Icel. stakkr; akin to Sw. stack, Dan. stak. Cf. {Stake}.] 1. A large and to some degree orderly pile of hay, grain, straw, or the like, usually of a nearly conical form, but sometimes rectangular or oblong, contracted… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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