To pay on
Pay Pay (p[=a]), v. i. To give a recompense; to make payment, requital, or satisfaction; to discharge a debt. [1913 Webster]

The wicked borroweth, and payeth not again. --Ps. xxxvii. 21. [1913 Webster]

2. Hence, to make or secure suitable return for expense or trouble; to be remunerative or profitable; to be worth the effort or pains required; as, it will pay to ride; it will pay to wait; politeness always pays. [1913 Webster]

{To pay for}. (a) To make amends for; to atone for; as, men often pay for their mistakes with loss of property or reputation, sometimes with life. (b) To give an equivalent for; to bear the expense of; to be mulcted on account of. [1913 Webster]

'T was I paid for your sleeps; I watched your wakings. --Beau. & Fl. [1913 Webster]

{To pay off}. [Etymol. uncertain.] (Naut.) To fall to leeward, as the head of a vessel under sail.

{To pay on}. [Etymol. uncertain.] To beat with vigor; to redouble blows. [Colloq.]

{To pay round} [Etymol. uncertain.] (Naut.) To turn the ship's head. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To go on — Go Go, v. i. [imp. {Went} (w[e^]nt); p. p. {Gone} (g[o^]n; 115); p. pr. & vb. n. {Going}. Went comes from the AS, wendan. See {Wend}, v. i.] [OE. gan, gon, AS. g[=a]n, akin to D. gaan, G. gehn, gehen, OHG. g[=e]n, g[=a]n, SW. g[*a], Dan. gaae; cf …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take on — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To come on — Come Come, v. i. [imp. {Came}; p. p. {Come}; p. pr & vb. n. {Coming}.] [OE. cumen, comen, AS. cuman; akin to OS.kuman, D. komen, OHG. queman, G. kommen, Icel. koma, Sw. komma, Dan. komme, Goth. giman, L. venire (gvenire), Gr. ? to go, Skr. gam.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To reckon on — Reckon Reck on, v. i. 1. To make an enumeration or computation; to engage in numbering or computing. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To come to an accounting; to make up accounts; to settle; to examine and strike the balance of debt and credit; to adjust …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To settle on — Settle Set tle, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Settled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Settling}.] [OE. setlen, AS. setlan. [root]154. See {Settle}, n. In senses 7, 8, and 9 perhaps confused with OE. sahtlen to reconcile, AS. sahtlian, fr. saht reconciliation, sacon to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To see on — See See, v. i. 1. To have the power of sight, or of perceiving by the proper organs; to possess or employ the sense of vision; as, he sees distinctly. [1913 Webster] Whereas I was blind, now I see. John ix. 25. [1913 Webster] 2. Figuratively: To… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pay for — Pay Pay (p[=a]), v. i. To give a recompense; to make payment, requital, or satisfaction; to discharge a debt. [1913 Webster] The wicked borroweth, and payeth not again. Ps. xxxvii. 21. [1913 Webster] 2. Hence, to make or secure suitable return… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pay off — Pay Pay (p[=a]), v. i. To give a recompense; to make payment, requital, or satisfaction; to discharge a debt. [1913 Webster] The wicked borroweth, and payeth not again. Ps. xxxvii. 21. [1913 Webster] 2. Hence, to make or secure suitable return… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pay round — Pay Pay (p[=a]), v. i. To give a recompense; to make payment, requital, or satisfaction; to discharge a debt. [1913 Webster] The wicked borroweth, and payeth not again. Ps. xxxvii. 21. [1913 Webster] 2. Hence, to make or secure suitable return… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pay one's footing — Footing Foot ing, n. 1. Ground for the foot; place for the foot to rest on; firm foundation to stand on. [1913 Webster] In ascent, every step gained is a footing and help to the next. Holder. [1913 Webster] 2. Standing; position; established… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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