To pass off
Pass Pass, v. t. 1. In simple, transitive senses; as: (a) To go by, beyond, over, through, or the like; to proceed from one side to the other of; as, to pass a house, a stream, a boundary, etc. (b) Hence: To go from one limit to the other of; to spend; to live through; to have experience of; to undergo; to suffer. ``To pass commodiously this life.'' --Milton. [1913 Webster]

She loved me for the dangers I had passed. --Shak. [1913 Webster] (c) To go by without noticing; to omit attention to; to take no note of; to disregard. [1913 Webster]

Please you that I may pass This doing. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

I pass their warlike pomp, their proud array. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] (d) To transcend; to surpass; to excel; to exceed. [1913 Webster]

And strive to pass . . . Their native music by her skillful art. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

Whose tender power Passes the strength of storms in their most desolate hour. --Byron. [1913 Webster] (e) To go successfully through, as an examination, trail, test, etc.; to obtain the formal sanction of, as a legislative body; as, he passed his examination; the bill passed the senate. [1913 Webster]

2. In causative senses: as: (a) To cause to move or go; to send; to transfer from one person, place, or condition to another; to transmit; to deliver; to hand; to make over; as, the waiter passed bisquit and cheese; the torch was passed from hand to hand. [1913 Webster]

I had only time to pass my eye over the medals. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

Waller passed over five thousand horse and foot by Newbridge. --Clarendon. [1913 Webster] (b) To cause to pass the lips; to utter; to pronounce; hence, to promise; to pledge; as, to pass sentence. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Father, thy word is passed. --Milton. [1913 Webster] (c) To cause to advance by stages of progress; to carry on with success through an ordeal, examination, or action; specifically, to give legal or official sanction to; to ratify; to enact; to approve as valid and just; as, he passed the bill through the committee; the senate passed the law. (e) To put in circulation; to give currency to; as, to pass counterfeit money. ``Pass the happy news.'' --Tennyson. (f) To cause to obtain entrance, admission, or conveyance; as, to pass a person into a theater, or over a railroad. [1913 Webster]

3. To emit from the bowels; to evacuate. [1913 Webster]

4. (Naut.) To take a turn with (a line, gasket, etc.), as around a sail in furling, and make secure. [1913 Webster]

5. (Fencing) To make, as a thrust, punto, etc. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{Passed midshipman}. See under Midshipman.

{To pass a dividend}, to omit the declaration and payment of a dividend at the time when due.

{To pass away}, to spend; to waste. ``Lest she pass away the flower of her age.'' --Ecclus. xlii. 9.

{To pass by}. (a) To disregard; to neglect. (b) To excuse; to spare; to overlook.

{To pass off}, to impose fraudulently; to palm off. ``Passed himself off as a bishop.'' --Macaulay.

{To pass (something) on (some one)} or {To pass (something) upon (some one)}, to put upon as a trick or cheat; to palm off. ``She passed the child on her husband for a boy.'' --Dryden.

{To pass over}, to overlook; not to note or resent; as, to pass over an affront. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To pass off — Pass Pass, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Passed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Passing}.] [F. passer, LL. passare, fr. L. passus step, or from pandere, passum, to spread out, lay open. See {Pace}.] 1. To go; to move; to proceed; to be moved or transferred from one… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To come off — Come Come, v. i. [imp. {Came}; p. p. {Come}; p. pr & vb. n. {Coming}.] [OE. cumen, comen, AS. cuman; akin to OS.kuman, D. komen, OHG. queman, G. kommen, Icel. koma, Sw. komma, Dan. komme, Goth. giman, L. venire (gvenire), Gr. ? to go, Skr. gam.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To go off — Go Go, v. i. [imp. {Went} (w[e^]nt); p. p. {Gone} (g[o^]n; 115); p. pr. & vb. n. {Going}. Went comes from the AS, wendan. See {Wend}, v. i.] [OE. gan, gon, AS. g[=a]n, akin to D. gaan, G. gehn, gehen, OHG. g[=e]n, g[=a]n, SW. g[*a], Dan. gaae; cf …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To fall off — Fall Fall (f[add]l), v. i. [imp. {Fell} (f[e^]l); p. p. {Fallen} (f[add]l n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Falling}.] [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To turn off — Turn Turn (t[^u]rn), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Turned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Turning}.] [OE. turnen, tournen, OF. tourner, torner, turner, F. tourner, LL. tornare, fr. L. tornare to turn in a lathe, to rounds off, fr. tornus a lathe, Gr. ? a turner s… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put off — Put Put, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Put}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Putting}.] [AS. potian to thrust: cf. Dan. putte to put, to put into, Fries. putje; perh. akin to W. pwtio to butt, poke, thrust; cf. also Gael. put to push, thrust, and E. potter, v. i.] 1. To …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To bring off — Bring Bring, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Brought}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Bringing}.] [OE. bringen, AS. bringan; akin to OS. brengian, D. brengen, Fries. brenga, OHG. bringan, G. bringen, Goth. briggan.] 1. To convey to the place where the speaker is or is to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To fly off — Fly Fly (fl[imac]), v. i. [imp. {Flew} (fl[=u]); p. p. {Flown} (fl[=o]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Flying}.] [OE. fleen, fleen, fleyen, flegen, AS. fle[ o]gan; akin to D. vliegen, OHG. fliogan, G. fliegen, Icel. flj[=u]ga, Sw. flyga, Dan. flyve, Goth. us …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To set off — Set Set (s[e^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Set}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Setting}.] [OE. setten, AS. setton; akin to OS. settian, OFries. setta, D. zetten, OHG. sezzen, G. setzen, Icel. setja, Sw. s[ a]tta, Dan. s?tte, Goth. satjan; causative from the root… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To strike off — Strike Strike, v. t. [imp. {Struck}; p. p. {Struck}, {Stricken}({Stroock}, {Strucken}, Obs.); p. pr. & vb. n. {Striking}. Struck is more commonly used in the p. p. than stricken.] [OE. striken to strike, proceed, flow, AS. str[=i]can to go,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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