To offend against
Offend Of*fend", v. i. 1. To transgress the moral or divine law; to commit a crime; to stumble; to sin. [1913 Webster]

Whosoever shall keep the whole law, and yet offend in one point, he is guilty of all. --James ii. 10. [1913 Webster]

If it be a sin to covet honor, I am the most offending soul alive. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To cause dislike, anger, or vexation; to displease. [1913 Webster]

I shall offend, either to detain or give it. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{To offend against}, to do an injury or wrong to; to commit an offense against. ``We have offended against the Lord already.'' --2 Chron. xxviii. 13. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Offend — Of*fend , v. i. 1. To transgress the moral or divine law; to commit a crime; to stumble; to sin. [1913 Webster] Whosoever shall keep the whole law, and yet offend in one point, he is guilty of all. James ii. 10. [1913 Webster] If it be a sin to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • offend — of|fend [əˈfend] v [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: offendre, from Latin offendere to strike against, offend ] 1.) [I and T] to make someone angry or upset by doing or saying something that they think is rude, unkind etc ▪ His remarks… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • offend — [[t]əfe̱nd[/t]] offends, offending, offended 1) VERB If you offend someone, you say or do something rude which upsets or embarrasses them. [V n] He apologizes for his comments and says he had no intention of offending the community... [V n] The… …   English dictionary

  • Offend — Of*fend, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Offended}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Offending}.] [OF. offendre, L. offendere, offensum; ob (see {Ob }) + fendere (in comp.) to thrust, dash. See {Defend}.] 1. To strike against; to attack; to assail. [Obs.] Sir P. Sidney.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • offend — [ə fend′] vi. [ME offenden < OFr offendre < L offendere, to strike against < ob (see OB ) + fendere, to hit, strike: see DEFEND] 1. to break a law, religious commandment, etc.; commit a sin or crime 2. to create resentment, anger, or… …   English World dictionary

  • offend — (v.) early 14c., to sin against (someone), from O.Fr. offendre, from L. offendere strike against, stumble, commit a fault, displease, from ob against + fendere to strike (found only in compounds). Meaning to violate (a law), to make a moral false …   Etymology dictionary

  • Against All Odds (N-Dubz album) — Against All Odds Studio album by N Dubz Released 13 November 2009 (Ireland …   Wikipedia

  • offend — verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French offendre, from Latin offendere to strike against, offend, from ob against + fendere to strike more at ob , defend Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. a. to transgress the moral or divine law ; …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • offend */ — UK [əˈfend] / US verb Word forms offend : present tense I/you/we/they offend he/she/it offends present participle offending past tense offended past participle offended 1) [transitive] to make someone upset and angry by doing or saying something… …   English dictionary

  • offend — verb 1 (transitive usually passive) to make someone angry or upset: be offended: Richard was deeply offended that people thought he d faked the story. | I hope you won t be offended if I leave early. | offend sb: I m sorry; have I done something… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

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