To mount a play
Mount Mount, v. t. 1. To get upon; to ascend; to climb; as, to mount the pulpit and deliver a sermon. [1913 Webster]

Shall we mount again the rural throne? --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

2. To place one's self on, as a horse or other animal, or anything that one sits upon; to bestride. [1913 Webster]

3. To cause to mount; to put on horseback; to furnish with animals for riding; to furnish with horses. ``To mount the Trojan troop.'' --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

4. Hence: To put upon anything that sustains and fits for use, as a gun on a carriage, a map or picture on cloth or paper; to prepare for being worn or otherwise used, as a diamond by setting, or a sword blade by adding the hilt, scabbard, etc.; as, to mount a picture or diploma in a frame [1913 Webster]

5. To raise aloft; to lift on high. [1913 Webster]

What power is it which mounts my love so high? --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Note: A fort or ship is said to mount cannon, when it has them arranged for use in or about it. [1913 Webster]

{To mount guard} (Mil.), to go on guard; to march on guard; to do duty as a guard.

{To mount a play}, to prepare and arrange the scenery, furniture, etc., used in the play. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To mount guard — Mount Mount, v. t. 1. To get upon; to ascend; to climb; as, to mount the pulpit and deliver a sermon. [1913 Webster] Shall we mount again the rural throne? Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. To place one s self on, as a horse or other animal, or anything… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To Kill a Mockingbird — For the film based on the novel, see To Kill a Mockingbird (film). To Kill a Mockingbird …   Wikipedia

  • Mount — Mount, v. t. 1. To get upon; to ascend; to climb; as, to mount the pulpit and deliver a sermon. [1913 Webster] Shall we mount again the rural throne? Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. To place one s self on, as a horse or other animal, or anything that… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • mount — mount1 [mount] n. [ME < OE munt & OFr mont, a mount, both < L mons (gen. montis), hill, mountain < IE base * men , to project > Welsh meneth, mountain] 1. a mountain or hill: now poetic except before a proper name [Mount McKinley] 2.… …   English World dictionary

  • mount — mount1 mountable, adj. mountless, adj. /mownt/, v.t. 1. to go up; climb; ascend: to mount stairs. 2. to get up on (a platform, a horse, etc.). 3. to set or place at an elevation: to mount a house on stilts. 4. to furnish with a horse or other… …   Universalium

  • mount´er — mount1 «mownt», verb, noun. –v.t. 1. to go up on or climb up; ascend: »to mount a hill, mount a ladder, mount stairs. It was our design to mount the head waters of the Hudson, to the neighbourhood of Crown Point (Robert Louis Stevenson).… …   Useful english dictionary

  • mount — I. /maʊnt / (say mownt) verb (t) 1. to go up or ascend: to mount the stairs. 2. to get up on (a platform, a horse, etc.) 3. to set or place at an elevation: to be mounted on stilts. 4. to furnish with a horse or other mount for riding. 5. to set… …   Australian English dictionary

  • mount — I [[t]maʊnt[/t]] v. t. 1) to go up; climb; ascend 2) to get up on (a platform, a horse, etc.) 3) to set or place at an elevation: to mount a house on stilts[/ex] 4) to furnish with a horse or other animal for riding 5) to set or place (a person)… …   From formal English to slang

  • A Clockwork Orange —    1) (1960–1961)    ANTHONY BURGESS’s novella was written early in his literary career, in 1960 and 1961. At the time, Burgess had been told that he had less than a year to live, and Clockwork was only one of several novels that he produced… …   The Encyclopedia of Stanley Kubrick

  • Mount Holyoke College — Seal of Mount Holyoke College Motto That our daughters may be as corner stones, polished after the similitude of a palace  Psalms 144:12 Established Seminary, 183 …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”