To miss stays
Miss Miss, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Missed} (m[i^]st); p. pr. & vb. n. {Missing}.] [AS. missan; akin to D. & G. missen, OHG. missan, Icel. missa, Sw. mista, Dan. miste. [root]100. See {Mis-}, pref.] 1. To fail of hitting, reaching, getting, finding, seeing, hearing, etc.; as, to miss the mark one shoots at; to miss the train by being late; to miss opportunites of getting knowledge; to miss the point or meaning of something said. [1913 Webster]

When a man misses his great end, happiness, he will acknowledge he judged not right. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

2. To omit; to fail to have or to do; to get without; to dispense with; -- now seldom applied to persons. [1913 Webster]

She would never miss, one day, A walk so fine, a sight so gay. --Prior. [1913 Webster]

We cannot miss him; he does make our fire, Fetch in our wood. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. To discover the absence or omission of; to feel the want of; to mourn the loss of; to want; as, to miss an absent loved one. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Neither missed we anything . . . Nothing was missed of all that pertained unto him. --1 Sam. xxv. 15, 21. [1913 Webster]

What by me thou hast lost, thou least shalt miss. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

{To miss stays}. (Naut.) See under {Stay}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To miss stays — Stay Stay (st[=a]), n. [AS. st[ae]g, akin to D., G., Icel., Sw., & Dan. stag; cf. OF. estai, F. [ e]tai, of Teutonic origin.] (Naut.) A large, strong rope, employed to support a mast, by being extended from the head of one mast down to some other …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • miss stays — phrasal of a ship : to fail in the attempt to go about * * * miss stays (nautical) To fail in going about from one tack to another • • • Main Entry: ↑miss …   Useful english dictionary

  • miss stays — (of a sailing ship) fail in an attempt to go about from one tack to another. → stays …   English new terms dictionary

  • Stays (nautical) — Stays are the heavy ropes, wires, or rods on sailing vessels that run from the masts to the hull, usually fore and aft along the centerline of the vessel. The stay that runs aft is called backstay and the stay that runs forward is called forestay …   Wikipedia

  • Miss — Miss, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Missed} (m[i^]st); p. pr. & vb. n. {Missing}.] [AS. missan; akin to D. & G. missen, OHG. missan, Icel. missa, Sw. mista, Dan. miste. [root]100. See {Mis }, pref.] 1. To fail of hitting, reaching, getting, finding,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • miss — Synonyms and related words: abandon, avoid, babe, baby, bachelor girl, be bereaved of, be blind to, be caught out, be inattentive, be unwary, bird, blink at, blunder, broad, bungle, chick, clerical error, coed, colleen, come short, connive at,… …   Moby Thesaurus

  • Miss Tulip Stays the Night — is a 1955 British comedy crime film directed by Leslie Arliss and starring Diana Dors, Patrick Holt, Jack Hulbert and Cicely Courtneidge.[1] A crime writer and his wife stay at a country house, where a mysterious corpse appears. Cast Diana Dors… …   Wikipedia

  • Miss Marple (TV series) — This article is about the TV series starring Joan Hickson. For other uses including the series with Geraldine McEwan and Julia McKenzie, see Marple (disambiguation). Miss Marple Miss Marple title card Format …   Wikipedia

  • Hove in stays — Stay Stay (st[=a]), n. [AS. st[ae]g, akin to D., G., Icel., Sw., & Dan. stag; cf. OF. estai, F. [ e]tai, of Teutonic origin.] (Naut.) A large, strong rope, employed to support a mast, by being extended from the head of one mast down to some other …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • In stays — Stay Stay (st[=a]), n. [AS. st[ae]g, akin to D., G., Icel., Sw., & Dan. stag; cf. OF. estai, F. [ e]tai, of Teutonic origin.] (Naut.) A large, strong rope, employed to support a mast, by being extended from the head of one mast down to some other …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”