To miss stays
Stay Stay (st[=a]), n. [AS. st[ae]g, akin to D., G., Icel., Sw., & Dan. stag; cf. OF. estai, F. ['e]tai, of Teutonic origin.] (Naut.) A large, strong rope, employed to support a mast, by being extended from the head of one mast down to some other, or to some part of the vessel. Those which lead forward are called fore-and-aft stays; those which lead to the vessel's side are called backstays. See Illust. of {Ship}. [1913 Webster]

{In stays}, or {Hove in stays} (Naut.), in the act or situation of staying, or going about from one tack to another. --R. H. Dana, Jr.

{Stay holes} (Naut.), openings in the edge of a staysail through which the hanks pass which join it to the stay.

{Stay tackle} (Naut.), a tackle attached to a stay and used for hoisting or lowering heavy articles over the side.

{To miss stays} (Naut.), to fail in the attempt to go about. --Totten.

{Triatic stay} (Naut.), a rope secured at the ends to the heads of the foremast and mainmast with thimbles spliced to its bight into which the stay tackles hook. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To miss stays — Miss Miss, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Missed} (m[i^]st); p. pr. & vb. n. {Missing}.] [AS. missan; akin to D. & G. missen, OHG. missan, Icel. missa, Sw. mista, Dan. miste. [root]100. See {Mis }, pref.] 1. To fail of hitting, reaching, getting, finding,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • miss stays — phrasal of a ship : to fail in the attempt to go about * * * miss stays (nautical) To fail in going about from one tack to another • • • Main Entry: ↑miss …   Useful english dictionary

  • miss stays — (of a sailing ship) fail in an attempt to go about from one tack to another. → stays …   English new terms dictionary

  • Stays (nautical) — Stays are the heavy ropes, wires, or rods on sailing vessels that run from the masts to the hull, usually fore and aft along the centerline of the vessel. The stay that runs aft is called backstay and the stay that runs forward is called forestay …   Wikipedia

  • Miss — Miss, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Missed} (m[i^]st); p. pr. & vb. n. {Missing}.] [AS. missan; akin to D. & G. missen, OHG. missan, Icel. missa, Sw. mista, Dan. miste. [root]100. See {Mis }, pref.] 1. To fail of hitting, reaching, getting, finding,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • miss — Synonyms and related words: abandon, avoid, babe, baby, bachelor girl, be bereaved of, be blind to, be caught out, be inattentive, be unwary, bird, blink at, blunder, broad, bungle, chick, clerical error, coed, colleen, come short, connive at,… …   Moby Thesaurus

  • Miss Tulip Stays the Night — is a 1955 British comedy crime film directed by Leslie Arliss and starring Diana Dors, Patrick Holt, Jack Hulbert and Cicely Courtneidge.[1] A crime writer and his wife stay at a country house, where a mysterious corpse appears. Cast Diana Dors… …   Wikipedia

  • Miss Marple (TV series) — This article is about the TV series starring Joan Hickson. For other uses including the series with Geraldine McEwan and Julia McKenzie, see Marple (disambiguation). Miss Marple Miss Marple title card Format …   Wikipedia

  • Hove in stays — Stay Stay (st[=a]), n. [AS. st[ae]g, akin to D., G., Icel., Sw., & Dan. stag; cf. OF. estai, F. [ e]tai, of Teutonic origin.] (Naut.) A large, strong rope, employed to support a mast, by being extended from the head of one mast down to some other …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • In stays — Stay Stay (st[=a]), n. [AS. st[ae]g, akin to D., G., Icel., Sw., & Dan. stag; cf. OF. estai, F. [ e]tai, of Teutonic origin.] (Naut.) A large, strong rope, employed to support a mast, by being extended from the head of one mast down to some other …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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