To make use of
Use Use, n. [OE. us use, usage, L. usus, from uti, p. p. usus, to use. See {Use}, v. t.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act of employing anything, or of applying it to one's service; the state of being so employed or applied; application; employment; conversion to some purpose; as, the use of a pen in writing; his machines are in general use. [1913 Webster]

Books can never teach the use of books. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

This Davy serves you for good uses. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

When he framed All things to man's delightful use. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. Occasion or need to employ; necessity; as, to have no further use for a book. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. Yielding of service; advantage derived; capability of being used; usefulness; utility. [1913 Webster]

God made two great lights, great for their use To man. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

'T is use alone that sanctifies expense. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

4. Continued or repeated practice; customary employment; usage; custom; manner; habit. [1913 Webster]

Let later age that noble use envy. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

How weary, stale, flat and unprofitable, Seem to me all the uses of this world! --Shak. [1913 Webster]

5. Common occurrence; ordinary experience. [R.] [1913 Webster]

O C[ae]sar! these things are beyond all use. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

6. (Eccl.) The special form of ritual adopted for use in any diocese; as, the Sarum, or Canterbury, use; the Hereford use; the York use; the Roman use; etc. [1913 Webster]

From henceforth all the whole realm shall have but one use. --Pref. to Book of Common Prayer. [1913 Webster]

7. The premium paid for the possession and employment of borrowed money; interest; usury. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Thou art more obliged to pay duty and tribute, use and principal, to him. --Jer. Taylor. [1913 Webster]

8. [In this sense probably a corruption of OF. oes, fr. L. opus need, business, employment, work. Cf. {Operate}.] (Law) The benefit or profit of lands and tenements. Use imports a trust and confidence reposed in a man for the holding of lands. He to whose use or benefit the trust is intended shall enjoy the profits. An estate is granted and limited to A for the use of B. [1913 Webster]

9. (Forging) A stab of iron welded to the side of a forging, as a shaft, near the end, and afterward drawn down, by hammering, so as to lengthen the forging. [1913 Webster]

{Contingent use}, or {Springing use} (Law), a use to come into operation on a future uncertain event.

{In use}. (a) In employment; in customary practice observance. (b) In heat; -- said especially of mares. --J. H. Walsh.

{Of no use}, useless; of no advantage.

{Of use}, useful; of advantage; profitable.

{Out of use}, not in employment.

{Resulting use} (Law), a use, which, being limited by the deed, expires or can not vest, and results or returns to him who raised it, after such expiration.

{Secondary use}, or {Shifting use}, a use which, though executed, may change from one to another by circumstances. --Blackstone.

{Statute of uses} (Eng. Law), the stat. 27 Henry VIII., cap. 10, which transfers uses into possession, or which unites the use and possession.

{To make use of}, {To put to use}, to employ; to derive service from; to use. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To make game of — Game Game, n. [OE. game, gamen, AS. gamen, gomen, play, sport; akin to OS., OHG., & Icel. gaman, Dan. gammen mirth, merriment, OSw. gamman joy. Cf. {Gammon} a game, {Backgammon}, {Gamble} v. i.] 1. Sport of any kind; jest, frolic. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • make use of — phrasal to put to use ; employ …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • To take advantage of — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take care of — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take hold of — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take notice of — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To be turned of — Turn Turn (t[^u]rn), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Turned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Turning}.] [OE. turnen, tournen, OF. tourner, torner, turner, F. tourner, LL. tornare, fr. L. tornare to turn in a lathe, to rounds off, fr. tornus a lathe, Gr. ? a turner s… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To lay hold of — Lay Lay (l[=a]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Laid} (l[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Laying}.] [OE. leggen, AS. lecgan, causative, fr. licgan to lie; akin to D. leggen, G. legen, Icel. leggja, Goth. lagjan. See {Lie} to be prostrate.] 1. To cause to lie down,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To fall abroad of — Fall Fall (f[add]l), v. i. [imp. {Fell} (f[e^]l); p. p. {Fallen} (f[add]l n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Falling}.] [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To fall foul of — Fall Fall (f[add]l), v. i. [imp. {Fell} (f[e^]l); p. p. {Fallen} (f[add]l n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Falling}.] [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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