To make one's manners
Manner Man"ner, n. [OE. manere, F. mani[`e]re, from OF. manier, adj., manual, skillful, handy, fr. (assumed) LL. manarius, for L. manuarius belonging to the hand, fr. manus the hand. See {Manual}.] 1. Mode of action; way of performing or effecting anything; method; style; form; fashion. [1913 Webster]

The nations which thou hast removed, and placed in the cities of Samaria, know not the manner of the God of the land. --2 Kings xvii. 26. [1913 Webster]

The temptations of prosperity insinuate themselves after a gentle, but very powerful, manner. --Atterbury. [1913 Webster]

2. Characteristic mode of acting, conducting, carrying one's self, or the like; bearing; habitual style. [1913 Webster] Specifically: (a) Customary method of acting; habit. [1913 Webster]

Paul, as his manner was, went in unto them. --Acts xvii. 2. [1913 Webster]

Air and manner are more expressive than words. --Richardson. [1913 Webster] (b) pl. Carriage; behavior; deportment; also, becoming behavior; well-bred carriage and address; as, mind your manners!. [1913 Webster]

Good manners are made up of petty sacrifices. --Emerson. [1913 Webster] (c) The style of writing or thought of an author; characteristic peculiarity of an artist. [1913 Webster]

3. Certain degree or measure; as, it is in a manner done already. [1913 Webster]

The bread is in a manner common. --1 Sam. xxi.5. [1913 Webster]

4. Sort; kind; style; -- in this application sometimes having the sense of a plural, sorts or kinds; as, all manners of people came to the rally. [1913 Webster +PJC]

And they being afraid wondered, saying to one another, What manner of man is this! for he commandeth even the winds and the water, and they obey him. --Luke 8: 25.

Ye tithe mint, and rue, and all manner of herbs. --Luke xi. 42. [1913 Webster]

I bid thee say, What manner of man art thou? --Coleridge. [1913 Webster]

Note: In old usage, of was often omitted after manner, when employed in this sense. ``A manner Latin corrupt was her speech.'' --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

{By any manner of means}, in any way possible; by any sort of means.

{To be taken in the manner} or {To be taken with the manner}. [A corruption of to be taken in the mainor. See {Mainor}.] To be taken in the very act. [Obs.] See {Mainor}.

{To make one's manners}, to make a bow or courtesy; to offer salutation.

{Manners bit}, a portion left in a dish for the sake of good manners. --Hallwell. [1913 Webster]

Syn: Method; mode; custom; habit; fashion; air; look; mien; aspect; appearance. See {Method}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • To be taken in the manner — Manner Man ner, n. [OE. manere, F. mani[ e]re, from OF. manier, adj., manual, skillful, handy, fr. (assumed) LL. manarius, for L. manuarius belonging to the hand, fr. manus the hand. See {Manual}.] 1. Mode of action; way of performing or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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