To make a fool of
Fool Fool, n. [OE. fol, n. & adj., F. fol, fou, foolish, mad; a fool, prob. fr. L. follis a bellows, wind bag, an inflated ball; perh. akin to E. bellows. Cf. {Folly}, {Follicle}.] 1. One destitute of reason, or of the common powers of understanding; an idiot; a natural. [1913 Webster]

2. A person deficient in intellect; one who acts absurdly, or pursues a course contrary to the dictates of wisdom; one without judgment; a simpleton; a dolt. [1913 Webster]

Extol not riches, then, the toil of fools. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

Experience keeps a dear school, but fools will learn in no other. --Franklin. [1913 Webster]

3. (Script.) One who acts contrary to moral and religious wisdom; a wicked person. [1913 Webster]

The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God. --Ps. xiv. 1. [1913 Webster]

4. One who counterfeits folly; a professional jester or buffoon; a retainer formerly kept to make sport, dressed fantastically in motley, with ridiculous accouterments. [1913 Webster]

Can they think me . . . their fool or jester? --Milton. [1913 Webster]

{April fool}, {Court fool}, etc. See under {April}, {Court}, etc.

{Fool's cap}, a cap or hood to which bells were usually attached, formerly worn by professional jesters.

{Fool's errand}, an unreasonable, silly, profitless adventure or undertaking.

{Fool's gold}, iron or copper pyrites, resembling gold in color.

{Fool's paradise}, a name applied to a limbo (see under {Limbo}) popularly believed to be the region of vanity and nonsense. Hence, any foolish pleasure or condition of vain self-satistaction.

{Fool's parsley} (Bot.), an annual umbelliferous plant ({[AE]thusa Cynapium}) resembling parsley, but nauseous and poisonous.

{To make a fool of}, to render ridiculous; to outwit; to shame. [Colloq.]

{To play the fool}, to act the buffoon; to act a foolish part. ``I have played the fool, and have erred exceedingly.'' --1 Sam. xxvi. 21. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • make a fool of — or (informal)[make a monkey of] {v. phr.} To make (someone) look foolish. * /The boy made a fool of himself./ * /Mary s classmates made a fool of her by telling her the party was to be a masquerade./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • make a fool of — or (informal)[make a monkey of] {v. phr.} To make (someone) look foolish. * /The boy made a fool of himself./ * /Mary s classmates made a fool of her by telling her the party was to be a masquerade./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • make a fool of — verb To cause (someone) to seem foolish. Syn: make a monkey of, make a monkey out of …   Wiktionary

  • make a spectacle of oneself — verb To embarrass oneself or others in public Syn: make a fool of oneself, make an exhibition of oneself …   Wiktionary

  • To make a clean breast — Breast Breast (br[e^]st), n. [OE. brest, breost, As. bre[ o]st; akin to Icel. brj[=o]st, Sw. br[ o]st, Dan. bryst, Goth. brusts, OS. briost, D. borst, G. brust.] 1. The fore part of the body, between the neck and the belly; the chest; as, the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To play the fool — Fool Fool, n. [OE. fol, n. & adj., F. fol, fou, foolish, mad; a fool, prob. fr. L. follis a bellows, wind bag, an inflated ball; perh. akin to E. bellows. Cf. {Folly}, {Follicle}.] 1. One destitute of reason, or of the common powers of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • make an ass of — verb To cause (someone) to seem foolish. Syn: make a fool of, make a fool out of, make a monkey of, make a monkey out of …   Wiktionary

  • make an exhibition of oneself — verb To embarrass oneself or others in public Syn: make a fool of oneself, make a spectacle of oneself …   Wiktionary

  • A Bucket of Blood — Infobox Film name = A Bucket of Blood caption = Theatrical release poster. director = Roger Corman producer = Roger Corman writer = Charles B. Griffith starring = Dick Miller music = Fred Katz cinematography = Jacques R. Marquette editing =… …   Wikipedia

  • To make nothing of — Nothing Noth ing, n. [From no, a. + thing.] 1. Not anything; no thing (in the widest sense of the word thing); opposed to {anything} and {something}. [1913 Webster] Yet had his aspect nothing of severe. Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. Nonexistence;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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