To make a fool of
Fool Fool, n. [OE. fol, n. & adj., F. fol, fou, foolish, mad; a fool, prob. fr. L. follis a bellows, wind bag, an inflated ball; perh. akin to E. bellows. Cf. {Folly}, {Follicle}.] 1. One destitute of reason, or of the common powers of understanding; an idiot; a natural. [1913 Webster]

2. A person deficient in intellect; one who acts absurdly, or pursues a course contrary to the dictates of wisdom; one without judgment; a simpleton; a dolt. [1913 Webster]

Extol not riches, then, the toil of fools. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

Experience keeps a dear school, but fools will learn in no other. --Franklin. [1913 Webster]

3. (Script.) One who acts contrary to moral and religious wisdom; a wicked person. [1913 Webster]

The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God. --Ps. xiv. 1. [1913 Webster]

4. One who counterfeits folly; a professional jester or buffoon; a retainer formerly kept to make sport, dressed fantastically in motley, with ridiculous accouterments. [1913 Webster]

Can they think me . . . their fool or jester? --Milton. [1913 Webster]

{April fool}, {Court fool}, etc. See under {April}, {Court}, etc.

{Fool's cap}, a cap or hood to which bells were usually attached, formerly worn by professional jesters.

{Fool's errand}, an unreasonable, silly, profitless adventure or undertaking.

{Fool's gold}, iron or copper pyrites, resembling gold in color.

{Fool's paradise}, a name applied to a limbo (see under {Limbo}) popularly believed to be the region of vanity and nonsense. Hence, any foolish pleasure or condition of vain self-satistaction.

{Fool's parsley} (Bot.), an annual umbelliferous plant ({[AE]thusa Cynapium}) resembling parsley, but nauseous and poisonous.

{To make a fool of}, to render ridiculous; to outwit; to shame. [Colloq.]

{To play the fool}, to act the buffoon; to act a foolish part. ``I have played the fool, and have erred exceedingly.'' --1 Sam. xxvi. 21. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • make a fool of — or (informal)[make a monkey of] {v. phr.} To make (someone) look foolish. * /The boy made a fool of himself./ * /Mary s classmates made a fool of her by telling her the party was to be a masquerade./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • make a fool of — or (informal)[make a monkey of] {v. phr.} To make (someone) look foolish. * /The boy made a fool of himself./ * /Mary s classmates made a fool of her by telling her the party was to be a masquerade./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • To make a clean breast — Breast Breast (br[e^]st), n. [OE. brest, breost, As. bre[ o]st; akin to Icel. brj[=o]st, Sw. br[ o]st, Dan. bryst, Goth. brusts, OS. briost, D. borst, G. brust.] 1. The fore part of the body, between the neck and the belly; the chest; as, the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To play the fool — Fool Fool, n. [OE. fol, n. & adj., F. fol, fou, foolish, mad; a fool, prob. fr. L. follis a bellows, wind bag, an inflated ball; perh. akin to E. bellows. Cf. {Folly}, {Follicle}.] 1. One destitute of reason, or of the common powers of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • A Bucket of Blood — Infobox Film name = A Bucket of Blood caption = Theatrical release poster. director = Roger Corman producer = Roger Corman writer = Charles B. Griffith starring = Dick Miller music = Fred Katz cinematography = Jacques R. Marquette editing =… …   Wikipedia

  • To make nothing of — Nothing Noth ing, n. [From no, a. + thing.] 1. Not anything; no thing (in the widest sense of the word thing); opposed to {anything} and {something}. [1913 Webster] Yet had his aspect nothing of severe. Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. Nonexistence;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • A Tale of a Tub — was the first major work written by Jonathan Swift, composed between 1694 and 1697 and published in 1704. It is arguably his most difficult satire, and perhaps his most masterly. The Tale is a prose parody which is divided into sections of… …   Wikipedia

  • To beg one for a fool — Beg Beg, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Begged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Begging}.] [OE. beggen, perh. fr. AS. bedecian (akin to Goth. bedagwa beggar), biddan to ask. (Cf. {Bid}, v. t.); or cf. beghard, beguin.] 1. To ask earnestly for; to entreat or supplicate… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To go a-begging — Beg Beg, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Begged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Begging}.] [OE. beggen, perh. fr. AS. bedecian (akin to Goth. bedagwa beggar), biddan to ask. (Cf. {Bid}, v. t.); or cf. beghard, beguin.] 1. To ask earnestly for; to entreat or supplicate… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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