To live on one's capital

To live on one's capital
capital cap"i*tal (k[a^]p"[i^]*tal), n. [Cf. L. capitellum and capitulum, a small head, the head, top, or capital of a column, dim. of caput head; F. chapiteau, OF. capitel. See {chief}, and cf. {cattle}, {chattel}, {chapiter}, {chapter}.] 1. (Arch.) The head or uppermost member of a column, pilaster, etc. It consists generally of three parts, abacus, bell (or vase), and necking. See these terms, and {Column}. [1913 Webster]

2. [Cf. F. capilate, fem., sc. ville.] (Geog.) The seat of government; the chief city or town in a country; a metropolis. ``A busy and splendid capital'' --Macauly. [1913 Webster]

3. [Cf. F. capital.] Money, property, or stock employed in trade, manufactures, etc.; the sum invested or lent, as distinguished from the income or interest. See {Capital stock}, under {Capital}, a. [1913 Webster]

4. (Polit. Econ.) That portion of the produce of industry, which may be directly employed either to support human beings or to assist in production. --M'Culloch. [1913 Webster]

Note: When wealth is used to assist production it is called capital. The capital of a civilized community includes {fixed capital} (i.e. buildings, machines, and roads used in the course of production and exchange) and {circulating capital} (i.e., food, fuel, money, etc., spent in the course of production and exchange). --T. Raleigh. [1913 Webster]

5. Anything which can be used to increase one's power or influence. [1913 Webster]

He tried to make capital out of his rival's discomfiture. --London Times. [1913 Webster]

6. (Fort.) An imaginary line dividing a bastion, ravelin, or other work, into two equal parts. [1913 Webster]

7. A chapter, or section, of a book. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Holy St. Bernard hath said in the 59th capital. --Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster]

8. (Print.) See {Capital letter}, under {Capital}, a. [1913 Webster]

{Active capital}. See under {Active},

{Small capital} (Print.), a small capital letter; informally referred to (in the plural) as {small caps}; as, the technical terms are listed in {small caps}. See under {Capital}, a.

{To live on one's capital}, to consume one's capital without producing or accumulating anything to replace it. [1913 Webster]

The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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