To let slip
Slip Slip, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Slipped}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Slipping}.] [OE. slippen; akin to LG. & D. slippen, MHG. slipfen (cf. Dan. slippe, Sw. slippa, Icel. sleppa), and fr. OE. slipen, AS. sl[=i]pan (in comp.), akin to G. schleifen to slide, glide, drag, whet, OHG. sl[=i]fan to slide, glide, make smooth, Icel. sl[=i]pa to whet; cf. also AS. sl?pan, Goth. sliupan, OS. slopian, OHG. sliofan, G. schliefen, schl?pfen, which seem to come from a somewhat different root form. Cf. {Slope}, n.] 1. To move along the surface of a thing without bounding, rolling, or stepping; to slide; to glide. [1913 Webster]

2. To slide; to lose one's footing or one's hold; not to tread firmly; as, it is necessary to walk carefully lest the foot should slip. [1913 Webster]

3. To move or fly (out of place); to shoot; -- often with out, off, etc.; as, a bone may slip out of its place. [1913 Webster]

4. To depart, withdraw, enter, appear, intrude, or escape as if by sliding; to go or come in a quiet, furtive manner; as, some errors slipped into the work. [1913 Webster]

Thus one tradesman slips away, To give his partner fairer play. --Prior. [1913 Webster]

Thrice the flitting shadow slipped away. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

5. To err; to fall into error or fault. [1913 Webster]

There is one that slippeth in his speech, but not from his heart. --Ecclus. xix. 16. [1913 Webster]

{To let slip}, to loose from the slip or noose, as a hound; to allow to escape. [1913 Webster]

Cry, ``Havoc,'' and let slip the dogs of war. --Shak. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • let slip something — let ˈslip sth idiom to give sb information that is supposed to be secret • I happened to let it slip that he had given me £1 000 for the car. • She tried not to let slip what she knew. Main entry: ↑slipidiom …   Useful english dictionary

  • let slip something — let slip (something) to say something that you did not intend to say because you wanted to keep it secret. Pam let slip an interesting bit of gossip yesterday. Stupidly, I let it slip that they d decided not to give him the job. (often + that) …   New idioms dictionary

  • let slip — (something) to say something that you did not intend to say because you wanted to keep it secret. Pam let slip an interesting bit of gossip yesterday. Stupidly, I let it slip that they d decided not to give him the job. (often + that) …   New idioms dictionary

  • let slip — phrasal : to allow to escape; especially : to impart (information) inadvertently let slip one day that he had once been married Nevil Shute * * * let slip 1. To reveal accidentally 2. To miss (an opportunity) • • • Main Entry: ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

  • let slip — verb To divulge a secret, as by accident or mistake. He finally let slip that they plan to take over the business …   Wiktionary

  • let slip — let (something) slip to say something that you intended to keep secret. She doesn t like to tell people what she s doing, but sometimes she ll let something slip. From time to time, Alex lets slip an ugly comment about his colleagues. Usage notes …   New idioms dictionary

  • let slip through fingers —    If you let something slip through your fingers, such as a good opportunity, you fail to obtain it or keep it.     He should have accepted the job when it was offered. He let the opportunity slip through his fingers …   English Idioms & idiomatic expressions

  • let slip — {v. phr.} To unintentionally reveal. * /Ellen let it slip that she had been a witness to the accident./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • let slip — {v. phr.} To unintentionally reveal. * /Ellen let it slip that she had been a witness to the accident./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • let\ slip — v. phr. To unintentionally reveal. Ellen let it slip that she had been a witness to the accident …   Словарь американских идиом

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”