To leave one in the lurch
Lurch Lurch, n. [OF. lourche name of a game; as adj., deceived, embarrassed.] 1. An old game played with dice and counters; a variety of the game of tables. [1913 Webster]

2. A double score in cribbage for the winner when his adversary has been left in the lurch. [1913 Webster]

Lady --- has cried her eyes out on losing a lurch. --Walpole. [1913 Webster]

{To leave one in the lurch}. (a) In the game of cribbage, to leave one's adversary so far behind that the game is won before he has scored thirty-one. (b) To leave one behind; hence, to abandon, or fail to stand by, a person in a difficulty. --Denham. [1913 Webster]

But though thou'rt of a different church, I will not leave thee in the lurch. --Hudibras. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • leave in the lurch — desert or leave alone and in trouble, refuse to help or support someone He left me in the lurch when he didn t come over to help me although he had promised to earlier in the day. (from Idioms in Speech) (smb) to leave (a person) in difficulties …   Idioms and examples

  • Lurch — Lurch, n. [OF. lourche name of a game; as adj., deceived, embarrassed.] 1. An old game played with dice and counters; a variety of the game of tables. [1913 Webster] 2. A double score in cribbage for the winner when his adversary has been left in …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • lurch — lurch1 [lʉrch] vi. [< ?] 1. to roll, pitch, or sway suddenly forward or to one side 2. to stagger n. [earlier lee lurch < ?] a lurching movement; sudden rolling, pitching, etc. lurch2 [lʉrch] vi. [ME lorchen …   English World dictionary

  • lurch — lurch1 [lə:tʃ US lə:rtʃ] v 1.) to walk or move suddenly in an uncontrolled or unsteady way lurch forward/to/towards/into etc ▪ Sam hit the gas and the car lurched forward. ▪ He lurched to his feet. 2.) your heart/stomach lurches used to say that… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • lurch — lurch1 [ lɜrtʃ ] verb intransitive 1. ) to move suddenly in a way that is not smooth or controlled: Joe lurched drunkenly into the room. The bus finally lurched to a halt outside the school. 2. ) if your heart or stomach lurches, it seems to… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • lurch — 1 verb (I) 1 to move suddenly forwards or sideways, usually because you cannot control your movements (+ across/into/along etc): Frank lurched back to his seat. | The car lurched forward across the grass. 2 your heart/stomach lurches used to say… …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • The Darjeeling Limited — Theatrical release poster Directed by Wes Anderson Produced by …   Wikipedia

  • lurch — [[t]lɜ͟ː(r)tʃ[/t]] lurches, lurching, lurched 1) VERB To lurch means to make a sudden movement, especially forwards, in an uncontrolled way. [V adv/prep] As the car sped over a pothole she lurched forward... [V adv/prep] Henry looked, stared, and …   English dictionary

  • leave — I v 1. quit, depart, go away, go along, take one’s leave, take leave; part, part company, separate from, go, go out, be off, get off, exit, make an exit, make off, be gone; push off, shove off, Inf. hightail it, Inf. buzz along, Inf. (both usu.… …   A Note on the Style of the synonym finder

  • lurch — lurch1 lurchingly, adv. /lerrch/, n. 1. an act or instance of swaying abruptly. 2. a sudden tip or roll to one side, as of a ship or a staggering person. 3. an awkward, swaying or staggering motion or gait. v.i. 4. (of a ship) to roll or pitch… …   Universalium

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