To lead off
Lead Lead, v. i. 1. To guide or conduct, as by accompanying, going before, showing, influencing, directing with authority, etc.; to have precedence or pre["e]minence; to be first or chief; -- used in most of the senses of lead, v. t. [1913 Webster]

2. To tend or reach in a certain direction, or to a certain place; as, the path leads to the mill; gambling leads to other vices. [1913 Webster]

The mountain foot that leads towards Mantua. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{To lead off} or {To lead out}, to go first; to begin; as, Mickey Mantle led off in the fifth inning of the game. [1913 Webster +PJC]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To cast off — Cast Cast (k[.a]st), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Cast}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Casting}.] [Cf. Dan. kaste, Icel. & Sw. kasta; perh. akin to L. {gerere} to bear, carry. E. jest.] 1. To send or drive by force; to throw; to fling; to hurl; to impel. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To strike off — Strike Strike, v. t. [imp. {Struck}; p. p. {Struck}, {Stricken}({Stroock}, {Strucken}, Obs.); p. pr. & vb. n. {Striking}. Struck is more commonly used in the p. p. than stricken.] [OE. striken to strike, proceed, flow, AS. str[=i]can to go,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To go off — Go Go, v. i. [imp. {Went} (w[e^]nt); p. p. {Gone} (g[o^]n; 115); p. pr. & vb. n. {Going}. Went comes from the AS, wendan. See {Wend}, v. i.] [OE. gan, gon, AS. g[=a]n, akin to D. gaan, G. gehn, gehen, OHG. g[=e]n, g[=a]n, SW. g[*a], Dan. gaae; cf …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To head off — Head Head (h[e^]d), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Headed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Heading}.] 1. To be at the head of; to put one s self at the head of; to lead; to direct; to act as leader to; as, to head an army, an expedition, or a riot. Dryden. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To carry off — Carry Car ry, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Carried}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Carrying}.] [OF. carier, charier, F. carrier, to cart, from OF. car, char, F. car, car. See {Car}.] 1. To convey or transport in any manner from one place to another; to bear; often… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To work off — Work Work (w[^u]rk), v. t. 1. To labor or operate upon; to give exertion and effort to; to prepare for use, or to utilize, by labor. [1913 Webster] He could have told them of two or three gold mines, and a silver mine, and given the reason why… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To bring off — Bring Bring, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Brought}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Bringing}.] [OE. bringen, AS. bringan; akin to OS. brengian, D. brengen, Fries. brenga, OHG. bringan, G. bringen, Goth. briggan.] 1. To convey to the place where the speaker is or is to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To give off — Give Give, v. i. 1. To give a gift or gifts. [1913 Webster] 2. To yield to force or pressure; to relax; to become less rigid; as, the earth gives under the feet. [1913 Webster] 3. To become soft or moist. [Obs.] Bacon . [1913 Webster] 4. To move; …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To lead out — Lead Lead, v. i. 1. To guide or conduct, as by accompanying, going before, showing, influencing, directing with authority, etc.; to have precedence or pre[ e]minence; to be first or chief; used in most of the senses of lead, v. t. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • lead off — verb 1. teach immoral behavior to (Freq. 1) It was common practice to lead off the young ones, and teach them bad habits • Syn: ↑lead astray • Hypernyms: ↑corrupt, ↑pervert, ↑subvert, ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

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