To lay a ship aboard
Aboard A*board", adv. [Pref. a- on, in + board.] 1. On board; into or within a ship or boat; hence, into or within a railway car. [1913 Webster]

2. Alongside; as, close aboard. [1913 Webster] (Naut.):

{To fall aboard of}, to strike a ship's side; to fall foul of.

{To haul the tacks aboard}, to set the courses.

{To keep the land aboard}, to hug the shore.

{To lay (a ship) aboard}, to place one's own ship close alongside of (a ship) for fighting. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To haul the tacks aboard — Aboard A*board , adv. [Pref. a on, in + board.] 1. On board; into or within a ship or boat; hence, into or within a railway car. [1913 Webster] 2. Alongside; as, close aboard. [1913 Webster] (Naut.): {To fall aboard of}, to strike a ship s side;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To keep the land aboard — Aboard A*board , adv. [Pref. a on, in + board.] 1. On board; into or within a ship or boat; hence, into or within a railway car. [1913 Webster] 2. Alongside; as, close aboard. [1913 Webster] (Naut.): {To fall aboard of}, to strike a ship s side;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Aboard — A*board , adv. [Pref. a on, in + board.] 1. On board; into or within a ship or boat; hence, into or within a railway car. [1913 Webster] 2. Alongside; as, close aboard. [1913 Webster] (Naut.): {To fall aboard of}, to strike a ship s side; to fall …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To fall aboard of — Aboard A*board , adv. [Pref. a on, in + board.] 1. On board; into or within a ship or boat; hence, into or within a railway car. [1913 Webster] 2. Alongside; as, close aboard. [1913 Webster] (Naut.): {To fall aboard of}, to strike a ship s side;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • ship — shipless, adj. shiplessly, adv. /ship/, n., v., shipped, shipping. n. 1. a vessel, esp. a large oceangoing one propelled by sails or engines. 2. Naut. a. a sailing vessel square rigged on all of three or more masts, having jibs, staysails, and a… …   Universalium

  • lay — lay1 /lay/, v., laid, laying, n. v.t. 1. to put or place in a horizontal position or position of rest; set down: to lay a book on a desk. 2. to knock or beat down, as from an erect position; strike or throw to the ground: One punch laid him low.… …   Universalium

  • lay — I [[t]leɪ[/t]] v. laid, lay•ing, n. 1) to put or place in a horizontal position or position of rest; set down: to lay a book on a desk[/ex] 2) to knock or beat down, as from an erect position; strike or throw to the ground: One punch laid him… …   From formal English to slang

  • lay — I. /leɪ / (say lay) verb (laid, laying) –verb (t) 1. to put or place in a position of rest or recumbency: to lay a book on a desk. 2. to bring, throw, or beat down, as from an erect position: to lay a person low. 3. to cause to subside: to lay… …   Australian English dictionary

  • lay aboard — phrasal : to place a ship close alongside of (a ship) for fighting or for boarding * * * lay aboard To run alongside, esp in order to board • • • Main Entry: ↑lay …   Useful english dictionary

  • Ship of the line — A ship of the line was a type of naval warship constructed from the 17th century through the mid 19th century, to take part in the the naval tactic known as the line of battle, in which two columns of opposing warships would manoeuvre to bring… …   Wikipedia

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