To kick the bucket
Kick Kick (k[i^]k), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Kicked} (k[i^]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Kicking}.] [W. cicio, fr. cic foot.] 1. To strike, thrust, or hit violently with the foot; as, a horse kicks a groom; a man kicks a dog. [1913 Webster]

He [Frederick the Great] kicked the shins of his judges. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

2. To evict or remove from a place or position, usually with out or off; as, they kicked him off the staff; he was kicked out of the restaurant; the landlord kicked them out of the apartment for making too much noise. [PJC]

3. (Sport) To score (goals or points) by kicking; as, they kicked three field goals in the game. [PJC]

4. To discontinue; -- usually used of habitual activities; as, to kick a habit; he kicked his drug habit. [PJC]

{To kick the beam}, to fit up and strike the beam; -- said of the lighter arm of a loaded balance; hence, to be found wanting in weight. --Milton.

{To kick the bucket}, to lose one's life; to die. [Colloq. & Low]

{To kick oneself}, to experience strong regret; as, he kicked himself for not investing in the stock market in 1995. [1913 Webster +PJC]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To kick the bucket — Bucket Buck et, n. [OE. boket; cf. AS. buc pitcher, or Corn. buket tub.] 1. A vessel for drawing up water from a well, or for catching, holding, or carrying water, sap, or other liquids. [1913 Webster] The old oaken bucket, the iron bound bucket …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To kick the beam — Kick Kick (k[i^]k), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Kicked} (k[i^]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Kicking}.] [W. cicio, fr. cic foot.] 1. To strike, thrust, or hit violently with the foot; as, a horse kicks a groom; a man kicks a dog. [1913 Webster] He [Frederick the …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • kick the bucket —    When someone kicks the bucket, they die.   (Dorking School Dictionary)    ***    To kick the bucket is a lighthearted way of talking about death.     He will inherit when his grandfather kicks the bucket! …   English Idioms & idiomatic expressions

  • kick the bucket — tv. to die. □ I’m too young to kick the bucket. □ The cat kicked the bucket last night …   Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • kick the bucket — Meaning Die. Origin The wooden frame that slaughtered animals were hung from is known as a bucket. The death spasms of the animals caused them to kick the bucket …   Meaning and origin of phrases

  • kick the bucket — verb pass from physical life and lose all bodily attributes and functions necessary to sustain life She died from cancer The children perished in the fire The patient went peacefully The old guy kicked the bucket at the age of 102 • Syn: ↑die,… …   Useful english dictionary

  • kick the bucket — verb /ˈkɪk ðə ˈbʌkɪt/ a) To die. The old horse finally kicked the bucket. b) Of a machine, to break down such that it cannot be repaired. I think my sewing machine has kicked the bucket. Syn: bite the dust, buy the farm …   Wiktionary

  • kick the bucket — vb to die. The phrase dates from the 17th or 18th centuries and the bucket in question may be either a suicide s prop or, more probably, a British dialect word (also in the form bucker ) for the beam from which slaughtered animals were hung. ►… …   Contemporary slang

  • kick the bucket — {v. phr.}, {slang} To die. * /Old Mr. Jones kicked the bucket just two days before his ninety fourth birthday./ Compare: KICK OFF(3) …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • kick the bucket — {v. phr.}, {slang} To die. * /Old Mr. Jones kicked the bucket just two days before his ninety fourth birthday./ Compare: KICK OFF(3) …   Dictionary of American idioms

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