To jump at
jump jump, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {jumped} (j[u^]mt; 215); p. pr. & vb. n. {jumping}.] [Akin to OD. gumpen, dial. G. gumpen, jumpen.] [1913 Webster] 1. To spring free from the ground by the muscular action of the feet and legs; to project one's self through the air; to spring; to bound; to leap. [1913 Webster]

Not the worst of the three but jumps twelve foot and a half by the square. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To move as if by jumping; to bounce; to jolt. ``The jumping chariots.'' --Nahum iii. 2. [1913 Webster]

A flock of geese jump down together. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

3. To coincide; to agree; to accord; to tally; -- followed by with. ``It jumps with my humor.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{To jump at}, to spring to; hence, fig., to accept suddenly or eagerly; as, a fish jumps at a bait; to jump at a chance. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To spring at — Spring Spring (spr[i^]ng), v. i. [imp. {Sprang} (spr[a^]ng) or {Sprung} (spr[u^]ng); p. p. {Sprung}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Springing}.] [AS. springan; akin to D. & G. springen, OS. & OHG. springan, Icel. & Sw. springa, Dan. springe; cf. Gr. spe… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To jump a claim — Jump Jump, v. t. 1. To pass over by means of a spring or leap; to overleap; as, to jump a stream. [1913 Webster] 2. To cause to jump; as, he jumped his horse across the ditch. [1913 Webster] 3. To expose to danger; to risk; to hazard. [Obs.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To jump one's bail — Jump Jump, v. t. 1. To pass over by means of a spring or leap; to overleap; as, to jump a stream. [1913 Webster] 2. To cause to jump; as, he jumped his horse across the ditch. [1913 Webster] 3. To expose to danger; to risk; to hazard. [Obs.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To jump the gun — Jump Jump, v. t. 1. To pass over by means of a spring or leap; to overleap; as, to jump a stream. [1913 Webster] 2. To cause to jump; as, he jumped his horse across the ditch. [1913 Webster] 3. To expose to danger; to risk; to hazard. [Obs.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • jump at sth — UK US jump at sth Phrasal Verb with jump({{}}/dʒʌmp/ verb [I] ► to quickly take advantage of a new opportunity: jump at the chance/opportunity »Many people jump at the chance to work overseas, seeing it as a way of earning far more than they… …   Financial and business terms

  • jump at — {v.} To take or accept quickly and gladly. * /Johnny jumped at the invitation to go swimming with his brother./ Compare: TAKE UP(7) …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • jump at — {v.} To take or accept quickly and gladly. * /Johnny jumped at the invitation to go swimming with his brother./ Compare: TAKE UP(7) …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • jump at the chance — verb To immediately accept an offer. When I was offered a placement working at the South Pole, I jumped at the chance …   Wiktionary

  • jump at — verb To accept something enthusiastically. Usually an opportunity, or chance, or job etc. I jumped at the position as soon as it was offered …   Wiktionary

  • jump at — (Roget s IV) v. Syn. embrace, snatch at, agree to; see seize 1 …   English dictionary for students

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