To indorse in blank
Indorse In*dorse", v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Indorsed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Indorsing}.] [LL. indorsare. See {Endorse}.] [Written also {endorse}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To cover the back of; to load or burden. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

Elephants indorsed with towers. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. To write upon the back or outside of a paper or letter, as a direction, heading, memorandum, or address. [1913 Webster]

3. (Law & Com.) To write one's name, alone or with other words, upon the back of (a paper), for the purpose of transferring it, or to secure the payment of a note, draft, or the like; to guarantee the payment, fulfillment, performance, or validity of, or to certify something upon the back of (a check, draft, writ, warrant of arrest, etc.). [1913 Webster]

4. To give one's name or support to; to sanction; to aid by approval; to approve; as, to indorse an opinion. [1913 Webster]

{To indorse in blank}, to write one's name on the back of a note or bill, leaving a blank to be filled by the holder. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Indorse — In*dorse , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Indorsed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Indorsing}.] [LL. indorsare. See {Endorse}.] [Written also {endorse}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To cover the back of; to load or burden. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Elephants indorsed with towers.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • endorse — Indorse In*dorse , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Indorsed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Indorsing}.] [LL. indorsare. See {Endorse}.] [Written also {endorse}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To cover the back of; to load or burden. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Elephants indorsed with… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Indorsed — Indorse In*dorse , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Indorsed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Indorsing}.] [LL. indorsare. See {Endorse}.] [Written also {endorse}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To cover the back of; to load or burden. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Elephants indorsed with… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Indorsing — Indorse In*dorse , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Indorsed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Indorsing}.] [LL. indorsare. See {Endorse}.] [Written also {endorse}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To cover the back of; to load or burden. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Elephants indorsed with… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • endorse — en·dorse also in·dorse /in dȯrs/ vt en·dorsed also in·dorsed, en·dors·ing, also, in·dors·ing [Anglo French endosser endorser and Medieval Latin indorsare, both ultimately from Latin in on + dorsum back] 1: to write on the back of; esp: to sign… …   Law dictionary

  • indorsement — noun 1. a promotional statement (as found on the dust jackets of books) the author got all his friends to write blurbs for his book • Syn: ↑endorsement, ↑blurb • Derivationally related forms: ↑indorse, ↑endorse (for: ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

  • Book of Abraham — For other meanings of this name, see Book of Abraham (disambiguation). A portion of the papyri considered by some to be source of the Book of Abraham. The difference between Egyptologists translation and Joseph Smith s interpretations have caused …   Wikipedia

  • List of law topics (A-E) — NOTOC Law [From Old English lagu something laid down or fixed ; legal comes from Latin legalis , from lex law , statute ( [http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=law searchmode=none Law] , Online Etymology Dictionary; [http://www.m… …   Wikipedia

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