To impose upon
Impose Im*pose", v. i. To practice tricks or deception. [1913 Webster]

{To impose on} or {To impose upon}, (a) to pass or put a trick on; to delude; to cheat; to defraud. ``He imposes on himself, and mistakes words for things.'' --Locke. (b) to place an unwelcome burden or obligation on (another person); as, she imposed on her friend to drive her daughter to school. (c) to take unfair advantage of (a person, a friendship); as, he imposed on his friendship with The Mayor to gain business. [1913 Webster +PJC]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To put upon — Put Put, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Put}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Putting}.] [AS. potian to thrust: cf. Dan. putte to put, to put into, Fries. putje; perh. akin to W. pwtio to butt, poke, thrust; cf. also Gael. put to push, thrust, and E. potter, v. i.] 1. To …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To impose on — Impose Im*pose , v. i. To practice tricks or deception. [1913 Webster] {To impose on} or {To impose upon}, (a) to pass or put a trick on; to delude; to cheat; to defraud. He imposes on himself, and mistakes words for things. Locke. (b) to place… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • a description given to the outright ownership of land that did not impose upon its owner the performance of feudal duties. — a description given to the outright ownership of land that did not impose upon its owner the performance of feudal duties. A writing or signature made by one person for another. Dictionary from West s Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005 …   Law dictionary

  • Impose — Im*pose , v. i. To practice tricks or deception. [1913 Webster] {To impose on} or {To impose upon}, (a) to pass or put a trick on; to delude; to cheat; to defraud. He imposes on himself, and mistakes words for things. Locke. (b) to place an… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • impose — verb a) to establish or apply by authority Congress imposed new tariffs. b) to be an inconvenience I dont wish to impose upon you …   Wiktionary

  • To stick out — Stick Stick, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Stuck}(Obs. {Sticked}); p. pr. & vb. n. {Sticking}.] [OE. stikien, v.t. & i., combined with steken, whence E. stuck), AS. stician, v.t. & i., and (assumed) stecan, v.t.; akin to OFries. steka, OS. stekan, OHG.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To sell — Sell Sell (s[e^]l), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sold} (s[=o]ld); p. pr. & vb. n. {Selling}.] [OE. sellen, sillen, AS. sellan, syllan, to give, to deliver; akin to OS. sellian, OFries. sella, OHG. sellen, Icel. selja to hand over, to sell, Sw. s[ a]lja… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To sell one's life dearly — Sell Sell (s[e^]l), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sold} (s[=o]ld); p. pr. & vb. n. {Selling}.] [OE. sellen, sillen, AS. sellan, syllan, to give, to deliver; akin to OS. sellian, OFries. sella, OHG. sellen, Icel. selja to hand over, to sell, Sw. s[ a]lja… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To blear the eye of — Blear Blear, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bleared}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Blearing}.] [OE. bleren; cf. Dan. plire to blink, Sw. plira to twinkle, wink, LG. plieren; perh. from the same root as E. blink. See {Blink}, and cf. {Blur}.] To make somewhat sore or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To fool away — Fool Fool, v. t. 1. To infatuate; to make foolish. Shak. [1913 Webster] For, fooled with hope, men favor the deceit. Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. To use as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying manner; to impose upon; to cheat by inspiring… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”