To impose on
Impose Im*pose", v. i. To practice tricks or deception. [1913 Webster]

{To impose on} or {To impose upon}, (a) to pass or put a trick on; to delude; to cheat; to defraud. ``He imposes on himself, and mistakes words for things.'' --Locke. (b) to place an unwelcome burden or obligation on (another person); as, she imposed on her friend to drive her daughter to school. (c) to take unfair advantage of (a person, a friendship); as, he imposed on his friendship with The Mayor to gain business. [1913 Webster +PJC]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To lay on — Lay Lay (l[=a]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Laid} (l[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Laying}.] [OE. leggen, AS. lecgan, causative, fr. licgan to lie; akin to D. leggen, G. legen, Icel. leggja, Goth. lagjan. See {Lie} to be prostrate.] 1. To cause to lie down,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put on — Put Put, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Put}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Putting}.] [AS. potian to thrust: cf. Dan. putte to put, to put into, Fries. putje; perh. akin to W. pwtio to butt, poke, thrust; cf. also Gael. put to push, thrust, and E. potter, v. i.] 1. To …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hold on — Hold Hold, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Held}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Holding}. {Holden}, p. p., is obs. in elegant writing, though still used in legal language.] [OE. haldan, D. houden, OHG. hoten, Icel. halda, Dan. holde, Sw. h[*a]lla, Goth. haldan to feed,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To impose upon — Impose Im*pose , v. i. To practice tricks or deception. [1913 Webster] {To impose on} or {To impose upon}, (a) to pass or put a trick on; to delude; to cheat; to defraud. He imposes on himself, and mistakes words for things. Locke. (b) to place… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To lay on load — Lay Lay (l[=a]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Laid} (l[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Laying}.] [OE. leggen, AS. lecgan, causative, fr. licgan to lie; akin to D. leggen, G. legen, Icel. leggja, Goth. lagjan. See {Lie} to be prostrate.] 1. To cause to lie down,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • impose on — {v.} To try to get more from (a person who is helping you) than he or she intended to give. * /Don t you think you are imposing on your neighbor when you use his telephone for half an hour?/ * /You may swim in the Allens pool so long as you do… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • impose on — {v.} To try to get more from (a person who is helping you) than he or she intended to give. * /Don t you think you are imposing on your neighbor when you use his telephone for half an hour?/ * /You may swim in the Allens pool so long as you do… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • Impose — Im*pose , v. i. To practice tricks or deception. [1913 Webster] {To impose on} or {To impose upon}, (a) to pass or put a trick on; to delude; to cheat; to defraud. He imposes on himself, and mistakes words for things. Locke. (b) to place an… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To fob off — Fob Fob, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Fobbed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Fobbing}.] [Cf.Fop.] [1913 Webster] 1. To beat; to maul. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 2. To cheat; to trick; to impose on. Shak. [1913 Webster] {To fob off}, to shift off by an artifice; to put… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Impose — Im*pose , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Imposed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Imposing}.] [F. imposer; pref. im in + poser to place. See {Pose}, v. t.] 1. To lay on; to set or place; to put; to deposit. [1913 Webster] Cakes of salt and barley [she] did impose Within …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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