To hold to
Hold Hold, v. i. In general, to keep one's self in a given position or condition; to remain fixed. Hence: [1913 Webster]

1. Not to move; to halt; to stop; -- mostly in the imperative. [1913 Webster]

And damned be him that first cries, ``Hold, enough!'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. Not to give way; not to part or become separated; to remain unbroken or unsubdued. [1913 Webster]

Our force by land hath nobly held. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. Not to fail or be found wanting; to continue; to last; to endure a test or trial; to abide; to persist. [1913 Webster]

While our obedience holds. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

The rule holds in land as all other commodities. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

4. Not to fall away, desert, or prove recreant; to remain attached; to cleave; -- often with with, to, or for. [1913 Webster]

He will hold to the one and despise the other. --Matt. vi. 24 [1913 Webster]

5. To restrain one's self; to refrain. [1913 Webster]

His dauntless heart would fain have held From weeping, but his eyes rebelled. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

6. To derive right or title; -- generally with of. [1913 Webster]

My crown is absolute, and holds of none. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

His imagination holds immediately from nature. --Hazlitt. [1913 Webster]

{Hold on!} {Hold up!} wait; stop; forbear. [Collog] -- {To hold forth}, to speak in public; to harangue; to preach. --L'Estrange.

{To hold in}, to restrain one's self; as, he wanted to laugh and could hardly hold in.

{To hold off}, to keep at a distance.

{To hold on}, to keep fast hold; to continue; to go on. ``The trade held on for many years,'' --Swift.

{To hold out}, to last; to endure; to continue; to maintain one's self; not to yield or give way.

{To hold over}, to remain in office, possession, etc., beyond a certain date.

{To hold to} or {To hold with}, to take sides with, as a person or opinion.

{To hold together}, to be joined; not to separate; to remain in union. --Dryden. --Locke.

{To hold up}. (a) To support one's self; to remain unbent or unbroken; as, to hold up under misfortunes. (b) To cease raining; to cease to stop; as, it holds up. --Hudibras. (c) To keep up; not to fall behind; not to lose ground. --Collier. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • To stand to — Stand Stand (st[a^]nd), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Stood} (st[oo^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Standing}.] [OE. standen; AS. standan; akin to OFries. stonda, st[=a]n, D. staan, OS. standan, st[=a]n, OHG. stantan, st[=a]n, G. stehen, Icel. standa, Dan. staae,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To lay to — Lay Lay (l[=a]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Laid} (l[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Laying}.] [OE. leggen, AS. lecgan, causative, fr. licgan to lie; akin to D. leggen, G. legen, Icel. leggja, Goth. lagjan. See {Lie} to be prostrate.] 1. To cause to lie down,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • To stick to — Stick Stick, v. i. 1. To adhere; as, glue sticks to the fingers; paste sticks to the wall. [1913 Webster] The green caterpillar breedeth in the inward parts of roses not blown, where the dew sticketh. Bacon. [1913 Webster] 2. To remain where… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take to — Take Take, v. i. 1. To take hold; to fix upon anything; to have the natural or intended effect; to accomplish a purpose; as, he was inoculated, but the virus did not take. Shak. [1913 Webster] When flame taketh and openeth, it giveth a noise.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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