To hold tack
Tack Tack, n. [OE. tak, takke, a fastening; akin to D. tak a branch, twig, G. zacke a twig, prong, spike, Dan. takke a tack, spike; cf. also Sw. tagg prickle, point, Icel. t[=a]g a willow twig, Ir. taca a peg, nail, fastening, Gael. tacaid, Armor. & Corn. tach; perhaps akin to E. take. Cf. {Attach}, {Attack}, {Detach}, {Tag} an end, {Zigzag}.] 1. A small, short, sharp-pointed nail, usually having a broad, flat head. [1913 Webster]

2. That which is attached; a supplement; an appendix. See {Tack}, v. t., 3. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster]

Some tacks had been made to money bills in King Charles's time. --Bp. Burnet. [1913 Webster]

3. (Naut.) (a) A rope used to hold in place the foremost lower corners of the courses when the vessel is closehauled (see Illust. of {Ship}); also, a rope employed to pull the lower corner of a studding sail to the boom. (b) The part of a sail to which the tack is usually fastened; the foremost lower corner of fore-and-aft sails, as of schooners (see Illust. of {Sail}). (c) The direction of a vessel in regard to the trim of her sails; as, the starboard tack, or port tack; -- the former when she is closehauled with the wind on her starboard side; hence, the run of a vessel on one tack; also, a change of direction; as, to take a different tack; -- often used metaphorically. [1913 Webster]

4. (Scots Law) A contract by which the use of a thing is set, or let, for hire; a lease. --Burrill. [1913 Webster]

5. Confidence; reliance. [Prov. Eng.] --Halliwell. [1913 Webster]

{Tack of a flag} (Naut.), a line spliced into the eye at the foot of the hoist for securing the flag to the halyards.

{Tack pins} (Naut.), belaying pins; -- also called {jack pins}.

{To haul the tacks aboard} (Naut.), to set the courses.

{To hold tack}, to last or hold out. --Milton. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • hold tack with — phrasal 1. of a boat : to keep on the same tacks as and change tacks with (another boat) 2. : to keep up with (as in activity) …   Useful english dictionary

  • Tack — Tack, n. [OE. tak, takke, a fastening; akin to D. tak a branch, twig, G. zacke a twig, prong, spike, Dan. takke a tack, spike; cf. also Sw. tagg prickle, point, Icel. t[=a]g a willow twig, Ir. taca a peg, nail, fastening, Gael. tacaid, Armor. &… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Tack of a flag — Tack Tack, n. [OE. tak, takke, a fastening; akin to D. tak a branch, twig, G. zacke a twig, prong, spike, Dan. takke a tack, spike; cf. also Sw. tagg prickle, point, Icel. t[=a]g a willow twig, Ir. taca a peg, nail, fastening, Gael. tacaid, Armor …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Tack pins — Tack Tack, n. [OE. tak, takke, a fastening; akin to D. tak a branch, twig, G. zacke a twig, prong, spike, Dan. takke a tack, spike; cf. also Sw. tagg prickle, point, Icel. t[=a]g a willow twig, Ir. taca a peg, nail, fastening, Gael. tacaid, Armor …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To haul the tacks aboard — Tack Tack, n. [OE. tak, takke, a fastening; akin to D. tak a branch, twig, G. zacke a twig, prong, spike, Dan. takke a tack, spike; cf. also Sw. tagg prickle, point, Icel. t[=a]g a willow twig, Ir. taca a peg, nail, fastening, Gael. tacaid, Armor …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • tack´er — tack1 «tak», noun, verb. –n. 1. a short, sharp pointed nail or pin with a flat, broad head: »We bought some carpet tacks. 2. a long, loose stitch used as a temporary fastening before final sewing. 3. any very slight, loose fastening: »hanging by… …   Useful english dictionary

  • tack — [[t]tæ̱k[/t]] tacks, tacking, tacked 1) N COUNT A tack is a short nail with a broad, flat head, especially one that is used for fastening carpets to the floor. → See also thumbtack get down to brass tacks → see brass 2) VERB If you tack something …   English dictionary

  • tack — {{11}}tack (n.1) clasp, hook, fastener, also a nail of some kind, late 13c., from O.N.Fr. taque nail, pin, peg, probably from a Germanic source (Cf. M.Du. tacke twig, spike, Low Ger. takk tine, pointed thing, Ger. Zacken sharp point, tooth, prong …   Etymology dictionary

  • tack hammer — noun a light hammer that is used to drive tacks (Freq. 3) • Hypernyms: ↑hammer * * * noun : a lightweight hammer that has usually one magnetized face and is used for holding and driving tacks * * * a light hammer for driving tacks, often… …   Useful english dictionary

  • To stand against — Stand Stand (st[a^]nd), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Stood} (st[oo^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Standing}.] [OE. standen; AS. standan; akin to OFries. stonda, st[=a]n, D. staan, OS. standan, st[=a]n, OHG. stantan, st[=a]n, G. stehen, Icel. standa, Dan. staae,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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