To hit on
Hit Hit, v. i. 1. To meet or come in contact; to strike; to clash; -- followed by against or on. [1913 Webster]

If bodies be extension alone, how can they move and hit one against another? --Locke. [1913 Webster]

Corpuscles, meeting with or hitting on those bodies, become conjoined with them. --Woodward. [1913 Webster]

2. To meet or reach what was aimed at or desired; to succeed, -- often with implied chance, or luck. [1913 Webster]

And oft it hits Where hope is coldest and despair most fits. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

And millions miss for one that hits. --Swift. [1913 Webster]

{To hit on} or {To hit upon}, to light upon; to come to by chance; to discover unexpectedly; as, he hit on the solution after days of trying. ``None of them hit upon the art.'' --Addison. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To take on — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To draw on — draw draw (dr[add]), v. t. [imp. {Drew} (dr[udd]); p. p. {Drawn} (dr[add]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Drawing}.] [OE. dra[yogh]en, drahen, draien, drawen, AS. dragan; akin to Icel. & Sw. draga, Dan. drage to draw, carry, and prob. to OS. dragan to bear,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hit upon — Hit Hit, v. i. 1. To meet or come in contact; to strike; to clash; followed by against or on. [1913 Webster] If bodies be extension alone, how can they move and hit one against another? Locke. [1913 Webster] Corpuscles, meeting with or hitting on …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hit off — Hit Hit, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Hit}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Hitting}.] [OE. hitten, hutten, of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. hitte to hit, find, Sw. & Icel. hitta.] 1. To reach with a stroke or blow; to strike or touch, usually with force; especially, to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hit out — Hit Hit, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Hit}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Hitting}.] [OE. hitten, hutten, of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. hitte to hit, find, Sw. & Icel. hitta.] 1. To reach with a stroke or blow; to strike or touch, usually with force; especially, to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hit on — v. t. To make sexual advances toward; usually of men making advances to women. [Colloq.] [PJC] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hit the nail on the head — Nail Nail (n[=a]l), n. [AS. n[ae]gel, akin to D. nagel, OS. & OHG. nagal, G. nagel, Icel. nagl, nail (in sense 1), nagli nail (in sense 3), Sw. nagel nail (in senses 1 and 3), Dan. nagle, Goth. ganagljan to nail, Lith. nagas nail (in sense 1),… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hit on — or[hit upon] {v.} To happen to meet, find, or reach; to choose or think by chance, * /John hit on a business that was just starting to grow rapidly./ * /There seemed to be several explanations of the crime, but the detectives hit on the right one …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • hit on — or[hit upon] {v.} To happen to meet, find, or reach; to choose or think by chance, * /John hit on a business that was just starting to grow rapidly./ * /There seemed to be several explanations of the crime, but the detectives hit on the right one …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • hit on all cylinders — {v. phr.} 1. To run smoothly or at full power without any missing or skipping. Said of a motor. * /The mechanic tuned the car engine until it was hitting on all cylinders./ 2. {informal} To think or work well; to use all your ability. * /The… …   Dictionary of American idioms

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