To hedge a bet
Hedge Hedge, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Hedged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Hedging}.] 1. To inclose or separate with a hedge; to fence with a thickly set line or thicket of shrubs or small trees; as, to hedge a field or garden. [1913 Webster]

2. To obstruct, as a road, with a barrier; to hinder from progress or success; -- sometimes with up and out. [1913 Webster]

I will hedge up thy way with thorns. --Hos. ii. 6. [1913 Webster]

Lollius Urbius . . . drew another wall . . . to hedge out incursions from the north. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

3. To surround for defense; to guard; to protect; to hem (in). ``England, hedged in with the main.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

4. To surround so as to prevent escape. [1913 Webster]

That is a law to hedge in the cuckoo. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

5. To protect oneself against excessive loss in an activity by taking a countervailing action; as, to hedge an investment denominated in a foreign currency by buying or selling futures in that currency; to hedge a donation to one political party by also donating to the opposed political party. [PJC]

{To hedge a bet}, to bet upon both sides; that is, after having bet on one side, to bet also on the other, thus guarding against loss. See hedge[5]. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Hedge — Hedge, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Hedged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Hedging}.] 1. To inclose or separate with a hedge; to fence with a thickly set line or thicket of shrubs or small trees; as, to hedge a field or garden. [1913 Webster] 2. To obstruct, as a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hedge — /hɛdʒ / (say hej) noun 1. a row of bushes or small trees planted close together, especially when forming a fence or boundary. 2. any barrier or boundary. 3. an act or a means of hedging a bet or the like. 4. an investment, fiscal policy, etc.,… …   Australian English dictionary

  • hedge — hedgeless, adj. /hej/, n., v., hedged, hedging. n. 1. a row of bushes or small trees planted close together, esp. when forming a fence or boundary; hedgerow: small fields separated by hedges. 2. any barrier or boundary: a hedge of stones. 3. an… …   Universalium

  • bet — I n. 1) to make a bet 2) to place a bet on 3) to accept, take a bet 4) a side bet 5) a bet that + clause (she made a bet that her team would win) 6) on a bet (he did it on a bet) 7) (misc.) to hedge one s bets ( to protect oneself by placing… …   Combinatory dictionary

  • hedge — I. noun Etymology: Middle English hegge, from Old English hecg; akin to Old English haga hedge, hawthorn Date: before 12th century 1. a. a fence or boundary formed by a dense row of shrubs or low trees b. barrier, limit 2. a means of protection… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • hedge — [[t]hɛdʒ[/t]] n. v. hedged, hedg•ing 1) bot a row of bushes or small trees planted close together, esp. when forming a fence or boundary; hedgerow 2) any barrier or boundary 3) an act or means of hedging: to buy gold as a hedge against… …   From formal English to slang

  • bet — I UK [bet] / US verb [intransitive/transitive] Word forms bet : present tense I/you/we/they bet he/she/it bets present participle betting past tense bet past participle bet ** to risk an amount of money by saying what you think will happen,… …   English dictionary

  • Hedge fund — A hedge fund is a private investment fund open to a limited range of investors which is permitted by regulators to undertake a wider range of activities than other investment funds and which pays a performance fee to its investment manager.… …   Wikipedia

  • Hedge — Hedge, v. i. 1. To shelter one s self from danger, risk, duty, responsibility, etc., as if by hiding in or behind a hedge; to skulk; to slink; to shirk obligations. [1913 Webster] I myself sometimes, leaving the fear of God on the left hand and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hedge your bets — phrase to organize a situation so that you have several choices available to you, in order to increase your chances of success People are evidently hedging their bets, looking to the future but not yet prepared to give up the past. Thesaurus: to… …   Useful english dictionary

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