To head off
Head Head (h[e^]d), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Headed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Heading}.] 1. To be at the head of; to put one's self at the head of; to lead; to direct; to act as leader to; as, to head an army, an expedition, or a riot. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

2. To form a head to; to fit or furnish with a head; as, to head a nail. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

3. To behead; to decapitate. [Obs.] --Shak. [1913 Webster]

4. To cut off the top of; to lop off; as, to head trees. [1913 Webster]

5. To go in front of; to get in the front of, so as to hinder or stop; to oppose; hence, to check or restrain; as, to head a drove of cattle; to head a person; the wind heads a ship. [1913 Webster]

6. To set on the head; as, to head a cask. [1913 Webster]

{To head off}, to intercept; to get before; as, an officer heads off a thief who is escaping. ``We'll head them off at the pass.''

{To head up}, (a) to close, as a cask or barrel, by fitting a head to. (b) To serve as the leader of; as, to head up a team of investigators. [1913 Webster +PJC]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To turn off — Turn Turn (t[^u]rn), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Turned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Turning}.] [OE. turnen, tournen, OF. tourner, torner, turner, F. tourner, LL. tornare, fr. L. tornare to turn in a lathe, to rounds off, fr. tornus a lathe, Gr. ? a turner s… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To knock off — Knock Knock (n[o^]k), v. t. 1. To strike with something hard or heavy; to move by striking; to drive (a thing) against something; as, to knock a ball with a bat; to knock the head against a post; to knock a lamp off the table. [1913 Webster] When …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To come off — Come Come, v. i. [imp. {Came}; p. p. {Come}; p. pr & vb. n. {Coming}.] [OE. cumen, comen, AS. cuman; akin to OS.kuman, D. komen, OHG. queman, G. kommen, Icel. koma, Sw. komma, Dan. komme, Goth. giman, L. venire (gvenire), Gr. ? to go, Skr. gam.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To fall off — Fall Fall (f[add]l), v. i. [imp. {Fell} (f[e^]l); p. p. {Fallen} (f[add]l n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Falling}.] [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To hold off — Hold Hold, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Held}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Holding}. {Holden}, p. p., is obs. in elegant writing, though still used in legal language.] [OE. haldan, D. houden, OHG. hoten, Icel. halda, Dan. holde, Sw. h[*a]lla, Goth. haldan to feed,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To go off — Go Go, v. i. [imp. {Went} (w[e^]nt); p. p. {Gone} (g[o^]n; 115); p. pr. & vb. n. {Going}. Went comes from the AS, wendan. See {Wend}, v. i.] [OE. gan, gon, AS. g[=a]n, akin to D. gaan, G. gehn, gehen, OHG. g[=e]n, g[=a]n, SW. g[*a], Dan. gaae; cf …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To break off — Break Break (br[=a]k), v. i. 1. To come apart or divide into two or more pieces, usually with suddenness and violence; to part; to burst asunder. [1913 Webster] 2. To open spontaneously, or by pressure from within, as a bubble, a tumor, a seed… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To give off — Give Give (g[i^]v), v. t. [imp. {Gave} (g[=a]v); p. p. {Given} (g[i^]v n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Giving}.] [OE. given, yiven, yeven, AS. gifan, giefan; akin to D. geven, OS. ge[eth]an, OHG. geban, G. geben, Icel. gefa, Sw. gifva, Dan. give, Goth.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pay off — Pay Pay (p[=a]), v. i. To give a recompense; to make payment, requital, or satisfaction; to discharge a debt. [1913 Webster] The wicked borroweth, and payeth not again. Ps. xxxvii. 21. [1913 Webster] 2. Hence, to make or secure suitable return… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pop off — Pop Pop, v. t. 1. To thrust or push suddenly; to offer suddenly; to bring suddenly and unexpectedly to notice; as, to pop one s head in at the door. [1913 Webster] He popped a paper into his hand. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. To cause to pop; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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