To haul home the sheets of a sail
Home Home, adv. 1. To one's home or country; as in the phrases, go home, come home, carry home. [1913 Webster]

2. Close; closely. [1913 Webster]

How home the charge reaches us, has been made out. --South. [1913 Webster]

They come home to men's business and bosoms. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

3. To the place where it belongs; to the end of a course; to the full length; as, to drive a nail home; to ram a cartridge home. [1913 Webster]

Wear thy good rapier bare and put it home. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Note: Home is often used in the formation of compound words, many of which need no special definition; as, home-brewed, home-built, home-grown, etc. [1913 Webster]

{To bring home}. See under {Bring}.

{To come home}. (a) To touch or affect personally. See under {Come}. (b) (Naut.) To drag toward the vessel, instead of holding firm, as the cable is shortened; -- said of an anchor.

{To haul home the sheets of a sail} (Naut.), to haul the clews close to the sheave hole. --Totten. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To bring home — Home Home, adv. 1. To one s home or country; as in the phrases, go home, come home, carry home. [1913 Webster] 2. Close; closely. [1913 Webster] How home the charge reaches us, has been made out. South. [1913 Webster] They come home to men s… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To come home — Home Home, adv. 1. To one s home or country; as in the phrases, go home, come home, carry home. [1913 Webster] 2. Close; closely. [1913 Webster] How home the charge reaches us, has been made out. South. [1913 Webster] They come home to men s… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Home — Home, adv. 1. To one s home or country; as in the phrases, go home, come home, carry home. [1913 Webster] 2. Close; closely. [1913 Webster] How home the charge reaches us, has been made out. South. [1913 Webster] They come home to men s business… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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