To get the start
Start Start, n. 1. The act of starting; a sudden spring, leap, or motion, caused by surprise, fear, pain, or the like; any sudden motion, or beginning of motion. [1913 Webster]

The fright awakened Arcite with a start. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

2. A convulsive motion, twitch, or spasm; a spasmodic effort. [1913 Webster]

For she did speak in starts distractedly. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Nature does nothing by starts and leaps, or in a hurry. --L'Estrange. [1913 Webster]

3. A sudden, unexpected movement; a sudden and capricious impulse; a sally; as, starts of fancy. [1913 Webster]

To check the starts and sallies of the soul. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

4. The beginning, as of a journey or a course of action; first motion from a place; act of setting out; the outset; -- opposed to {finish}. [1913 Webster]

The start of first performance is all. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips, Straining upon the start. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{At a start}, at once; in an instant. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

At a start he was betwixt them two. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]

{To get the start}, or {To have the start}, to begin before another; to gain or have the advantage in a similar undertaking; -- usually with of. ``Get the start of the majestic world.'' --Shak. ``She might have forsaken him if he had not got the start of her.'' --Dryden. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • To have the start — Start Start, n. 1. The act of starting; a sudden spring, leap, or motion, caused by surprise, fear, pain, or the like; any sudden motion, or beginning of motion. [1913 Webster] The fright awakened Arcite with a start. Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. A… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Get the Message (song) — Infobox Single Name = Get the Message Caption = The first British 12 inch. Artist = Electronic Album = Electronic A side = B side = Free Will Released = Start date|1991|4|15 Format = 7 inch, 12 inch, CD, cassette Recorded = 1990 Genre = Length =… …   Wikipedia

  • get the ball rolling — or[set the ball rolling] or[start the ball rolling] {informal} To start an activity or action; make a beginning; begin. * /George started the ball rolling at the party by telling a new joke./ Compare: KEEP THE BALL ROLLING …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • get the ball rolling — or[set the ball rolling] or[start the ball rolling] {informal} To start an activity or action; make a beginning; begin. * /George started the ball rolling at the party by telling a new joke./ Compare: KEEP THE BALL ROLLING …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • get the show on the road — {v. phr.}, {informal} To start a program; get work started. * /It was several years before the rocket scientists got the show on the road./ Compare: GET THE BALL ROLLING …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • get the show on the road — {v. phr.}, {informal} To start a program; get work started. * /It was several years before the rocket scientists got the show on the road./ Compare: GET THE BALL ROLLING …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • get the jump on — or[have the jump on] {v. phr.}, {slang} To get ahead of; start before (others); have an advantage over. * /Don t let the other boys get the jump on you at the beginning of the race./ * /Our team got the jump on their rivals in the first minutes… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • get the jump on — or[have the jump on] {v. phr.}, {slang} To get ahead of; start before (others); have an advantage over. * /Don t let the other boys get the jump on you at the beginning of the race./ * /Our team got the jump on their rivals in the first minutes… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • get the worst of — also[have the worst of] {v. phr.} To lose; be defeated or beaten in; suffer most. * /Joe got the worst of the argument with Molly./ Often used in the phrase the worst of it . * /If you start a fight with Jim, you may get the worst of it./ * /Bill …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • get the worst of — also[have the worst of] {v. phr.} To lose; be defeated or beaten in; suffer most. * /Joe got the worst of the argument with Molly./ Often used in the phrase the worst of it . * /If you start a fight with Jim, you may get the worst of it./ * /Bill …   Dictionary of American idioms

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