To get the range of
Range Range, n. [From {Range}, v.: cf. F. rang['e]e.] 1. A series of things in a line; a row; a rank; as, a range of buildings; a range of mountains. [1913 Webster]

2. An aggregate of individuals in one rank or degree; an order; a class. [1913 Webster]

The next range of beings above him are the immaterial intelligences. --Sir M. Hale. [1913 Webster]

3. The step of a ladder; a rung. --Clarendon. [1913 Webster]

4. A kitchen grate. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

He was bid at his first coming to take off the range, and let down the cinders. --L'Estrange. [1913 Webster]

5. An extended cooking apparatus of cast iron, set in brickwork, and affording conveniences for various ways of cooking; also, a kind of cooking stove. [1913 Webster]

6. A bolting sieve to sift meal. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.] [1913 Webster]

7. A wandering or roving; a going to and fro; an excursion; a ramble; an expedition. [1913 Webster]

He may take a range all the world over. --South. [1913 Webster]

8. That which may be ranged over; place or room for excursion; especially, a region of country in which cattle or sheep may wander and pasture. [1913 Webster]

9. Extent or space taken in by anything excursive; compass or extent of excursion; reach; scope; discursive power; as, the range of one's voice, or authority. [1913 Webster]

Far as creation's ample range extends. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

The range and compass of Hammond's knowledge filled the whole circle of the arts. --Bp. Fell. [1913 Webster]

A man has not enough range of thought. --Addison. [1913 Webster]

10. (Biol.) The region within which a plant or animal naturally lives. [1913 Webster]

11. (Gun.) (a) The horizontal distance to which a shot or other projectile is carried. (b) Sometimes, less properly, the trajectory of a shot or projectile. (c) A place where shooting, as with cannons or rifles, is practiced. [1913 Webster]

12. In the public land system of the United States, a row or line of townships lying between two successive meridian lines six miles apart. [1913 Webster]

Note: The meridians included in each great survey are numbered in order east and west from the ``principal meridian'' of that survey, and the townships in the range are numbered north and south from the ``base line,'' which runs east and west; as, township No. 6, N., range 7, W., from the fifth principal meridian. [1913 Webster]

13. (Naut.) See {Range of cable}, below. [1913 Webster]

{Range of accommodation} (Optics), the distance between the near point and the far point of distinct vision, -- usually measured and designated by the strength of the lens which if added to the refracting media of the eye would cause the rays from the near point to appear as if they came from the far point.

{Range finder} (Gunnery), an instrument, or apparatus, variously constructed, for ascertaining the distance of an inaccessible object, -- used to determine what elevation must be given to a gun in order to hit the object; a position finder.

{Range of cable} (Naut.), a certain length of slack cable ranged along the deck preparatory to letting go the anchor.

{Range work} (Masonry), masonry of squared stones laid in courses each of which is of even height throughout the length of the wall; -- distinguished from broken range work, which consists of squared stones laid in courses not continuously of even height.

{To get the range of} (an object) (Gun.), to find the angle at which the piece must be raised to reach (the object) without carrying beyond. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Range of accommodation — Range Range, n. [From {Range}, v.: cf. F. rang[ e]e.] 1. A series of things in a line; a row; a rank; as, a range of buildings; a range of mountains. [1913 Webster] 2. An aggregate of individuals in one rank or degree; an order; a class. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Range of cable — Range Range, n. [From {Range}, v.: cf. F. rang[ e]e.] 1. A series of things in a line; a row; a rank; as, a range of buildings; a range of mountains. [1913 Webster] 2. An aggregate of individuals in one rank or degree; an order; a class. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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