To get on
Get Get (g[e^]t), v. i. 1. To make acquisition; to gain; to profit; to receive accessions; to be increased. [1913 Webster]

We mourn, France smiles; we lose, they daily get. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To arrive at, or bring one's self into, a state, condition, or position; to come to be; to become; -- with a following adjective or past participle belonging to the subject of the verb; as, to get sober; to get awake; to get beaten; to get elected. [1913 Webster]

To get rid of fools and scoundrels. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

His chariot wheels get hot by driving fast. --Coleridge. [1913 Webster]

Note: It [get] gives to the English language a middle voice, or a power of verbal expression which is neither active nor passive. Thus we say to get acquitted, beaten, confused, dressed. --Earle. [1913 Webster]

Note: Get, as an intransitive verb, is used with a following preposition, or adverb of motion, to indicate, on the part of the subject of the act, movement or action of the kind signified by the preposition or adverb; or, in the general sense, to move, to stir, to make one's way, to advance, to arrive, etc.; as, to get away, to leave, to escape; to disengage one's self from; to get down, to descend, esp. with effort, as from a literal or figurative elevation; to get along, to make progress; hence, to prosper, succeed, or fare; to get in, to enter; to get out, to extricate one's self, to escape; to get through, to traverse; also, to finish, to be done; to get to, to arrive at, to reach; to get off, to alight, to descend from, to dismount; also, to escape, to come off clear; to get together, to assemble, to convene. [1913 Webster]

{To get ahead}, to advance; to prosper.

{To get along}, to proceed; to advance; to prosper.

{To get a mile} (or other distance), to pass over it in traveling.

{To get among}, to go or come into the company of; to become one of a number.

{To get asleep}, to fall asleep.

{To get astray}, to wander out of the right way.

{To get at}, to reach; to make way to.

{To get away with}, to carry off; to capture; hence, to get the better of; to defeat.

{To get back}, to arrive at the place from which one departed; to return.

{To get before}, to arrive in front, or more forward.

{To get behind}, to fall in the rear; to lag.

{To get between}, to arrive between.

{To get beyond}, to pass or go further than; to exceed; to surpass. ``Three score and ten is the age of man, a few get beyond it.'' --Thackeray.

{To get clear}, to disengage one's self; to be released, as from confinement, obligation, or burden; also, to be freed from danger or embarrassment.

{To get drunk}, to become intoxicated.

{To get forward}, to proceed; to advance; also, to prosper; to advance in wealth.

{To get home}, to arrive at one's dwelling, goal, or aim.

{To get into}. (a) To enter, as, ``she prepared to get into the coach.'' --Dickens. (b) To pass into, or reach; as, `` a language has got into the inflated state.'' --Keary.

{To get loose} or {To get free}, to disengage one's self; to be released from confinement.

{To get near}, to approach within a small distance.

{To get on}, to proceed; to advance; to prosper.

{To get over}. (a) To pass over, surmount, or overcome, as an obstacle or difficulty. (b) To recover from, as an injury, a calamity.

{To get through}. (a) To pass through something. (b) To finish what one was doing.

{To get up}. (a) To rise; to arise, as from a bed, chair, etc. (b) To ascend; to climb, as a hill, a tree, a flight of stairs, etc. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To come on — Come Come, v. i. [imp. {Came}; p. p. {Come}; p. pr & vb. n. {Coming}.] [OE. cumen, comen, AS. cuman; akin to OS.kuman, D. komen, OHG. queman, G. kommen, Icel. koma, Sw. komma, Dan. komme, Goth. giman, L. venire (gvenire), Gr. ? to go, Skr. gam.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take on — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To have on — Have Have (h[a^]v), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Had} (h[a^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Having}. Indic. present, I {have}, thou {hast}, he {has}; we, ye, they {have}.] [OE. haven, habben, AS. habben (imperf. h[ae]fde, p. p. geh[ae]fd); akin to OS. hebbian, D.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To put on — Put Put, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Put}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Putting}.] [AS. potian to thrust: cf. Dan. putte to put, to put into, Fries. putje; perh. akin to W. pwtio to butt, poke, thrust; cf. also Gael. put to push, thrust, and E. potter, v. i.] 1. To …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To run on — Run Run, v. i. [imp. {Ran}or {Run}; p. p. {Run}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Running}.] [OE. rinnen, rennen (imp. ran, p. p. runnen, ronnen). AS. rinnan to flow (imp. ran, p. p. gerunnen), and iernan, irnan, to run (imp. orn, arn, earn, p. p. urnen); akin… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To carry on — Carry Car ry, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Carried}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Carrying}.] [OF. carier, charier, F. carrier, to cart, from OF. car, char, F. car, car. See {Car}.] 1. To convey or transport in any manner from one place to another; to bear; often… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To gain on — Gain Gain, v. i. To have or receive advantage or profit; to acquire gain; to grow rich; to advance in interest, health, or happiness; to make progress; as, the sick man gains daily. [1913 Webster] Thou hast greedily gained of thy neighbors by… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To help on — Help Help (h[e^]lp), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Helped} (h[e^]lpt) (Obs. imp. {Holp} (h[=o]lp), p. p. {Holpen} (h[=o]l p n)); p. pr. & vb. n. {Helping}.] [AS. helpan; akin to OS. helpan, D. helpen, G. helfen, OHG. helfan, Icel. hj[=a]lpa, Sw. hjelpa,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To see on — See See, v. i. 1. To have the power of sight, or of perceiving by the proper organs; to possess or employ the sense of vision; as, he sees distinctly. [1913 Webster] Whereas I was blind, now I see. John ix. 25. [1913 Webster] 2. Figuratively: To… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To get a mile — Get Get (g[e^]t), v. i. 1. To make acquisition; to gain; to profit; to receive accessions; to be increased. [1913 Webster] We mourn, France smiles; we lose, they daily get. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To arrive at, or bring one s self into, a state,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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