To get along
Along A*long" (?; 115), adv. [OE. along, anlong, AS. andlang, along; pref. and- (akin to OFris. ond-, OHG. ant-, Ger. ent-, Goth. and-, anda-, L. ante, Gr. ?, Skr. anti, over against) + lang long. See {Long}.] 1. By the length; in a line with the length; lengthwise. [1913 Webster]

Some laid along . . . on spokes of wheels are hung. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

2. In a line, or with a progressive motion; onward; forward. [1913 Webster]

We will go along by the king's highway. --Numb. xxi. 22. [1913 Webster]

He struck with his o'ertaking wings, And chased us south along. --Coleridge. [1913 Webster]

3. In company; together. [1913 Webster]

He to England shall along with you. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{All along}, all through the course of; during the whole time; throughout. ``I have all along declared this to be a neutral paper.'' --Addison.

{To get along}, to get on; to make progress, as in business. ``She 'll get along in heaven better than you or I.'' --Mrs. Stowe. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To get along — Get Get (g[e^]t), v. i. 1. To make acquisition; to gain; to profit; to receive accessions; to be increased. [1913 Webster] We mourn, France smiles; we lose, they daily get. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To arrive at, or bring one s self into, a state,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • ability to get along with others — index discretion (quality of being discreet) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • To take along — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • get along — also[get on] {v.} 1. To go or move away; move on. * /The policeman told the boys on the street corner to get along./ 2. To go forward; make progress; advance, * /John is getting along well in school. He is learning more every day./ Syn.: GET… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • get along — also[get on] {v.} 1. To go or move away; move on. * /The policeman told the boys on the street corner to get along./ 2. To go forward; make progress; advance, * /John is getting along well in school. He is learning more every day./ Syn.: GET… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • get\ along — • get along (in years) v 1. To go or move away; move on. The policeman told the boys on the street corner to get along. 2. To go forward; make progress; advance, John is getting along well in school. He is learning more every day. Syn.: get ahead …   Словарь американских идиом

  • get\ along\ in\ years — • get along (in years) v 1. To go or move away; move on. The policeman told the boys on the street corner to get along. 2. To go forward; make progress; advance, John is getting along well in school. He is learning more every day. Syn.: get ahead …   Словарь американских идиом

  • get along — or[on in years] {v. phr.} To age; grow old. * /My father is getting along in years; he will be ninety on his next birthday./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • get along — or[on in years] {v. phr.} To age; grow old. * /My father is getting along in years; he will be ninety on his next birthday./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • To get a mile — Get Get (g[e^]t), v. i. 1. To make acquisition; to gain; to profit; to receive accessions; to be increased. [1913 Webster] We mourn, France smiles; we lose, they daily get. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To arrive at, or bring one s self into, a state,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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