To foot a bill
Foot Foot, v. t. 1. To kick with the foot; to spurn. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

2. To set on foot; to establish; to land. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

What confederacy have you with the traitors Late footed in the kingdom? --Shak. [1913 Webster]

3. To tread; as, to foot the green. --Tickell. [1913 Webster]

4. To sum up, as the numbers in a column; -- sometimes with up; as, to foot (or foot up) an account. [1913 Webster]

5. To seize or strike with the talon. [Poet.] --Shak. [1913 Webster]

6. To renew the foot of, as of a stocking. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{To foot a bill}, to pay it. [Colloq.] -- {To foot it}, to walk; also, to dance. [1913 Webster]

If you are for a merry jaunt, I'll try, for once, who can foot it farthest. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To foot it — Foot Foot, v. t. 1. To kick with the foot; to spurn. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To set on foot; to establish; to land. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] What confederacy have you with the traitors Late footed in the kingdom? Shak. [1913 Webster] 3. To tread; as …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • foot the bill — Ⅰ. foot the bill ► to pay the cost of something: »Senior managers might be able to get employers to foot the bill for a weekend executive MBA program. Main Entry: ↑foot Ⅱ. foot the bill ► to pay a bill: »Should the go …   Financial and business terms

  • Foot the bill — The idiom foot the bill means basically :1. to pay all the costs for something (We ended up having to foot the bill for a new roof because our insurance didn t cover storm damage.) [http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/foot+the+bill The Free… …   Wikipedia

  • foot the bill — (informal) PAY (THE BILL), settle up; informal pick up the tab, cough up, fork out, shell out, come across; N. Amer. informal pick up the check. → foot * * * foot the bill (informal) To p …   Useful english dictionary

  • foot the bill — 1. to pay all the costs for something. We ended up having to foot the bill for a new roof because our insurance didn t cover storm damage. 2. to pay money owed. Who s going to foot the bill for all the repairs? …   New idioms dictionary

  • foot the bill (for something) — informal phrase to pay for something that is expensive or that someone else should be paying for Many fear the taxpayer could end up footing a massive bill. Thesaurus: to spend or to pay moneysynonym Main entry …   Useful english dictionary

  • To bear a hand — Hand Hand (h[a^]nd), n. [AS. hand, hond; akin to D., G., & Sw. hand, OHG. hant, Dan. haand, Icel. h[ o]nd, Goth. handus, and perh. to Goth. hin[thorn]an to seize (in comp.). Cf. {Hunt}.] 1. That part of the fore limb below the forearm or wrist in …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To have a hand in — Hand Hand (h[a^]nd), n. [AS. hand, hond; akin to D., G., & Sw. hand, OHG. hant, Dan. haand, Icel. h[ o]nd, Goth. handus, and perh. to Goth. hin[thorn]an to seize (in comp.). Cf. {Hunt}.] 1. That part of the fore limb below the forearm or wrist in …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To lend a hand — Hand Hand (h[a^]nd), n. [AS. hand, hond; akin to D., G., & Sw. hand, OHG. hant, Dan. haand, Icel. h[ o]nd, Goth. handus, and perh. to Goth. hin[thorn]an to seize (in comp.). Cf. {Hunt}.] 1. That part of the fore limb below the forearm or wrist in …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To pass a dividend — Pass Pass, v. t. 1. In simple, transitive senses; as: (a) To go by, beyond, over, through, or the like; to proceed from one side to the other of; as, to pass a house, a stream, a boundary, etc. (b) Hence: To go from one limit to the other of; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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