To fool away
Fool Fool, v. t. 1. To infatuate; to make foolish. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

For, fooled with hope, men favor the deceit. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

2. To use as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying manner; to impose upon; to cheat by inspiring foolish confidence; as, to fool one out of his money. [1913 Webster]

You are fooled, discarded, and shook off By him for whom these shames ye underwent. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{To fool away}, to get rid of foolishly; to spend in trifles, idleness, folly, or without advantage. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • fool away — verb spend frivolously and unwisely Fritter away one s inheritance • Syn: ↑fritter, ↑frivol away, ↑dissipate, ↑shoot, ↑fritter away, ↑fool • Derivationally related forms: ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

  • fool away — (Roget s Thesaurus II) I verb To spend (money) excessively and usually foolishly: consume, dissipate, fritter away, riot away, squander, throw away, trifle away, waste. Slang: blow1. See SAVE. II verb See fool …   English dictionary for students

  • fool away — or[fritter away] {v.}, {informal} To waste foolishly. * /Paul failed history because he fooled away his time instead of studying./ * /The man won a lot of money, but he soon frittered it away and was poor again./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • fool away — or[fritter away] {v.}, {informal} To waste foolishly. * /Paul failed history because he fooled away his time instead of studying./ * /The man won a lot of money, but he soon frittered it away and was poor again./ …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • fool\ away — v informal To waste foolishly. Paul failed history because he fooled away his time instead of studying. The man won a lot of money, but he soon frittered it away and was poor again …   Словарь американских идиом

  • fool away — verb to waste, squander …   Wiktionary

  • Fool — Fool, v. t. 1. To infatuate; to make foolish. Shak. [1913 Webster] For, fooled with hope, men favor the deceit. Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. To use as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying manner; to impose upon; to cheat by inspiring… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fool — fool1 /foohl/, n. 1. a silly or stupid person; a person who lacks judgment or sense. 2. a professional jester, formerly kept by a person of royal or noble rank for amusement: the court fool. 3. a person who has been tricked or deceived into… …   Universalium

  • fool — fool1 [fo͞ol] n. [ME fol < OFr (Fr fou) < LL follis < L, windbag, bellows: see FOLLICLE] 1. a) a person with little or no judgment, common sense, wisdom, etc.; silly or stupid person; simpleton b) Obs. a mentally retarded person 2. a man …   English World dictionary

  • fool — I. /ful / (say foohl) noun 1. someone who lacks sense; a silly or stupid person. 2. a professional jester, formerly kept by a person of rank for amusement. 3. a weak minded or idiotic person. –verb (t) 4. to make a fool of; impose on; trick;… …   Australian English dictionary

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