To fish the anchor
Fish Fish, v. t. [OE. fischen, fisken, fissen, AS. fiscian; akin to G. fischen, OHG. fisc?n, Goth. fisk?n. See {Fish} the animal.] 1. To catch; to draw out or up; as, to fish up an anchor. [1913 Webster]

2. To search by raking or sweeping. --Swift. [1913 Webster]

3. To try with a fishing rod; to catch fish in; as, to fish a stream. --Thackeray. [1913 Webster]

4. To strengthen (a beam, mast, etc.), or unite end to end (two timbers, railroad rails, etc.) by bolting a plank, timber, or plate to the beam, mast, or timbers, lengthwise on one or both sides. See {Fish joint}, under {Fish}, n. [1913 Webster]

{To fish the anchor}. (Naut.) See under {Anchor}. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To fish the anchor — Anchor An chor ([a^][ng] k[ e]r), n. [OE. anker, AS. ancor, oncer, L. ancora, sometimes spelt anchora, fr. Gr. a gkyra, akin to E. angle: cf. F. ancre. See {Angle}, n.] 1. A iron instrument which is attached to a ship by a cable (rope or chain),… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To cat the anchor — Anchor An chor ([a^][ng] k[ e]r), n. [OE. anker, AS. ancor, oncer, L. ancora, sometimes spelt anchora, fr. Gr. a gkyra, akin to E. angle: cf. F. ancre. See {Angle}, n.] 1. A iron instrument which is attached to a ship by a cable (rope or chain),… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To back an anchor — Anchor An chor ([a^][ng] k[ e]r), n. [OE. anker, AS. ancor, oncer, L. ancora, sometimes spelt anchora, fr. Gr. a gkyra, akin to E. angle: cf. F. ancre. See {Angle}, n.] 1. A iron instrument which is attached to a ship by a cable (rope or chain),… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • The anchor comes home — Anchor An chor ([a^][ng] k[ e]r), n. [OE. anker, AS. ancor, oncer, L. ancora, sometimes spelt anchora, fr. Gr. a gkyra, akin to E. angle: cf. F. ancre. See {Angle}, n.] 1. A iron instrument which is attached to a ship by a cable (rope or chain),… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • The anchor is acockbill — Anchor An chor ([a^][ng] k[ e]r), n. [OE. anker, AS. ancor, oncer, L. ancora, sometimes spelt anchora, fr. Gr. a gkyra, akin to E. angle: cf. F. ancre. See {Angle}, n.] 1. A iron instrument which is attached to a ship by a cable (rope or chain),… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • The anchor is apeak — Anchor An chor ([a^][ng] k[ e]r), n. [OE. anker, AS. ancor, oncer, L. ancora, sometimes spelt anchora, fr. Gr. a gkyra, akin to E. angle: cf. F. ancre. See {Angle}, n.] 1. A iron instrument which is attached to a ship by a cable (rope or chain),… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • The anchor is atrip — Anchor An chor ([a^][ng] k[ e]r), n. [OE. anker, AS. ancor, oncer, L. ancora, sometimes spelt anchora, fr. Gr. a gkyra, akin to E. angle: cf. F. ancre. See {Angle}, n.] 1. A iron instrument which is attached to a ship by a cable (rope or chain),… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • The anchor is awash — Anchor An chor ([a^][ng] k[ e]r), n. [OE. anker, AS. ancor, oncer, L. ancora, sometimes spelt anchora, fr. Gr. a gkyra, akin to E. angle: cf. F. ancre. See {Angle}, n.] 1. A iron instrument which is attached to a ship by a cable (rope or chain),… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • The Anchor (as Symbol) —     The Anchor (as Symbol)     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► The Anchor (as Symbol)     The anchor, because of the great importance in navigation, was regarded in ancient times as a symbol of safety. The Christians, therefore, in adopting the anchor… …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • To bite the ground — ground ground (ground), n. [OE. ground, grund, AS. grund; akin to D. grond, OS., G., Sw., & Dan. grund, Icel. grunnr bottom, Goth. grundus (in composition); perh. orig. meaning, dust, gravel, and if so perh. akin to E. grind.] 1. The surface of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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