To fill out
Fill Fill, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Filled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Filling}.] [OE. fillen, fullen, AS. fyllan, fr. full full; akin to D. vullen, G. f["u]llen, Icel. fylla, Sw. fylla, Dan. fylde, Goth. fulljan. See {Full}, a.] 1. To make full; to supply with as much as can be held or contained; to put or pour into, till no more can be received; to occupy the whole capacity of. [1913 Webster]

The rain also filleth the pools. --Ps. lxxxiv. 6. [1913 Webster]

Jesus saith unto them, Fill the waterpots with water. Anf they filled them up to the brim. --John ii. 7. [1913 Webster]

2. To furnish an abudant supply to; to furnish with as mush as is desired or desirable; to occupy the whole of; to swarm in or overrun. [1913 Webster]

And God blessed them, saying. Be fruitful, and multiply, and fill the waters in the seas. --Gen. i. 22. [1913 Webster]

The Syrians filled the country. --1 Kings xx. 27. [1913 Webster]

3. To fill or supply fully with food; to feed; to satisfy. [1913 Webster]

Whence should we have so much bread in the wilderness, as to fillso great a multitude? --Matt. xv. 33. [1913 Webster]

Things that are sweet and fat are more filling. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

4. To possess and perform the duties of; to officiate in, as an incumbent; to occupy; to hold; as, a king fills a throne; the president fills the office of chief magistrate; the speaker of the House fills the chair. [1913 Webster]

5. To supply with an incumbent; as, to fill an office or a vacancy. --A. Hamilton. [1913 Webster]

6. (Naut.) (a) To press and dilate, as a sail; as, the wind filled the sails. (b) To trim (a yard) so that the wind shall blow on the after side of the sails. [1913 Webster]

7. (Civil Engineering) To make an embankment in, or raise the level of (a low place), with earth or gravel. [1913 Webster]

{To fill in}, to insert; as, he filled in the figures.

{To fill out}, to extend or enlarge to the desired limit; to make complete; as, to fill out a bill.

{To fill up}, to make quite full; to fill to the brim or entirely; to occupy completely; to complete. ``The bliss that fills up all the mind.'' --Pope. ``And fill up that which is behind of the afflictions of Christ.'' --Col. i. 24. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • To dub out — Dub Dub (d[u^]b), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dubbed} (d[u^]bd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Dubbing}.] [AS. dubban to strike, beat ( dubbade his sunu . . . to r[=i]dere. AS. Chron. an. 1086); akin to Icel. dubba; cf. OF. adouber (prob. fr. Icel.) a chevalier,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To take out — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To crowd out — Crowd Crowd (kroud), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Crowded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Crowding}.] [OE. crouden, cruden, AS. cr[=u]dan; cf. D. kruijen to push in a wheelbarrow.] 1. To push, to press, to shove. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] 2. To press or drive together; …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To blow out — Blow Blow, v. t. 1. To force a current of air upon with the mouth, or by other means; as, to blow the fire. [1913 Webster] 2. To drive by a current air; to impel; as, the tempest blew the ship ashore. [1913 Webster] Off at sea northeast winds… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To back out — Back Back, v. i. 1. To move or go backward; as, the horse refuses to back. [1913 Webster] 2. (Naut.) To change from one quarter to another by a course opposite to that of the sun; used of the wind. [1913 Webster] 3. (Sporting) To stand still… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fill out — {v.} 1. To put in what is missing; complete; finish; {especially}, to complete (a printed application blank or other form) by writing the missing facts in the blank spaces; to write down facts which are asked for in (a report or application.) *… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • fill out — {v.} 1. To put in what is missing; complete; finish; {especially}, to complete (a printed application blank or other form) by writing the missing facts in the blank spaces; to write down facts which are asked for in (a report or application.) *… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • To fill in — Fill Fill, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Filled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Filling}.] [OE. fillen, fullen, AS. fyllan, fr. full full; akin to D. vullen, G. f[ u]llen, Icel. fylla, Sw. fylla, Dan. fylde, Goth. fulljan. See {Full}, a.] 1. To make full; to supply… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To fill up — Fill Fill, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Filled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Filling}.] [OE. fillen, fullen, AS. fyllan, fr. full full; akin to D. vullen, G. f[ u]llen, Icel. fylla, Sw. fylla, Dan. fylde, Goth. fulljan. See {Full}, a.] 1. To make full; to supply… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fill out — verb 1. write all the required information onto a form (Freq. 5) fill out this questionnaire, please! make out a form • Syn: ↑complete, ↑fill in, ↑make out • Entailment: ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

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